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What's the biggest impact changes I can make to my usage to help me hit my Power Move target?

What's the biggest impact changes I can make to my usage to help me hit my Power Move target?

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Userlevel 2

I’ve decided cake is the answer …. last month I did 2 big lots of baking and was well beneath the 12.5% target, and in November I baked the Christmas cake (all on weekdays outside 4-7pm). This month I have done no baking … and am just scraping by at 11.5%. So cake it has to be🍰 🤣

I too hit the target in January after 3 failures when I tried so hard that I was turning off my fridge freezer between 4 and 7. The secret for me was counter intuitive. Instead of chasing reductions when my usage was running at 4-6p per 30 minutes, I increased my usage at other times.  Using an electric cooking device at lunchtime instead of gas hob made a difference. I did not turn off my fridge freezer!  

Opposite for us again only got to 14%. Cut down across the whole day so can’t cut anything else out during 4-7pm. The only way we could succeed is to use more electricity to increase the ratio which defeats the object. Our overall usage compared to previous years is much less but just can’t beat this ratio. 

I think that you have picked up on a valid point here.

There are two things happening for many people - firstly, trying to reduce overall consumption (to reduce cost) and secondly, to minimise consumption during the peak period (to get the £20 monthly bonus).

Crucially, the key to the second is to understand the rules - firstly, weekends and bank holidays don’t count. Secondly, the peak period is 4 - 7 pm Monday to Friday. It’s a matter of rebalancing when you consume electricity.

So here are a few tips - since the weekend doesn’t count, don’t see that as meaning that you should do all your energy consuming activities at the weekend. Move as much of this activity that you can to the non-peak Monday to Friday. You’re going to use the electricity anyway, so use it when it is most beneficial to meet the target. This means, don’t run the dishwasher or washing machine at the weekend, unless you really have to. If you use an electric shower, use it during the week (off-peak times). The objective is to reduce your energy usage between 4 and 7 as a proportion of the whole day, so the more you can consume at non-peak times, the better.

Now, I’m not advocating wasting electricity (that could cost more than the bonus is worth!), just using it at a time that achieves what you want - meeting the target.

And this can be done on relatively low daily consumption. My average daily consumption in Dec was 8.97kW, and 6.60kW in Jan (my son went away for three weeks!) yet my average peak time consumption was 0.91kW and 0.67kW respectively. During the peak period we have on the TV, lights in one room, modem and TV box, fridge and freezer. We reheat in the microwave and cook a lot on the hob.

Ultimately, if your consumption is low, the target can still be achieved.

The other key to getting this is to understand your consumption. Look at your daily usage. I created a spreadsheet to analyse the data, so I know exactly where I am during each month and can adjust accordingly. I can even see if I’m doing really well and can celebrate with the oven on at peak times during the week!

Userlevel 1

I have kept my gas central heating on throughout and left everything on as usual. The biggest change I have made is to run the washing machine, tumble dryer and dishwasher during the week rather than weekends and not between 4-7. I have also avoided using my electric oven from 4-7. This has enabled me to be just below 12.5% each month. This month I am so far at 3.86% because my boiler broke down and I was without it for 10 days so used multiple electric heaters outside 4-7.

Userlevel 1

I think it's good that you're examining this more. Like most of the above, I gave up as.  then only real way to change the balance was to increase over all usage outside the times you want us to reduce use. A month sitting in the dark wearing two blankets etc did not help.

The obvious ways to achieve this would be: 

-Turning of fridges/freezers during the peak hours

- supplying households with timer switches for tvs etc to ensure they are not left on standby (as the plugs are inaccessible),

-supplying batteries to charge overnight during the cheap, non peak hours (similar to the ones used for storing power produced by solar panels etc),

-making it affordable to install heat exchange/solar power technology fitted. 

I understand the crisis we are facing but actually the study probably had a negative effect on my long term usage because of the depression i suffered sitting in the dark, being too cold to do anything.

Very happy to discuss this further, especially if it helps reduce wasted energy

 

We’re a family with 3 children aged between 6 and 1. Initially we couldn’t work out how we could achieve it, but last month we got our first credit, and it looks to be going well this month too. I think mainly due to a post on here from someone who said to move heavy usage things from the weekend to during the week - so rather than putting the washing machine/dishwasher in on Sunday afternoon/evening we wait until Monday morning. 
Happy to be contacted for a case study

Userlevel 7
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A few thoughts about the current Power Move challenge - limit usage in the period 4-7PM to 12.5% of the daily usage on weekdays.

I only have one month’s experience, so no specific tips at this stage. However, I have been keeping detailed tabs on my usage. The graph below shows my half-hourly weekday usage so far this month (red bars). I’ve highlighted the target period and marked the target I’m supposed to hit. (The alarming red 10AM spike is my morning electric shower, so not important in this context.)

I’ve also added two curves showing the gross demand for electricity across Britain, for yesterday and the day before, to highlight the weekday/weekend difference. Beware of the scale for demand: it’s fudged a bit to make the distinction more obvious.
  
 

 

The first thing that caught my eye was the fact that high-peak demand is about an hour later than the Power Move target, i.e. about 5-8PM. This will change over the coming weeks as lighting and heating come into play earlier each day, and there will of course be a step change at the end of British Summer Time. It feels as if we’re just practising for when it really begins to matter, when that high-peak demand could trigger power cuts if all the factors involved conspire together.

This also made me think that, if everyone defers using power until after the high-peak period, there might be an uncomfortable national spike as every light, kettle, cooker, TV and games console in the country is switched on simultaneously. My own 7PM bar illustrates this possibility.

Then there’s the question of carbon intensity - how much CO₂ is emitted by energy generation from time to time. This varies a great deal from day to day and from hour to hour, especially as the proportion of power from renewable sources increases. Any shortfall caused by, say, a lack of wind will normally have to be met by burning fossil fuels, pumping more CO₂ into the atmosphere. Shifting consumption to after the target period won’t have much effect on this, but moving it to earlier in the day when the sun is shining might help. Often, the time when it’s best to consume electricity from a carbon-intensity perspective will be quite different from the Power Move objective.

I can think of no compelling reason why consumption in the target period should be higher than it is in the wee small hours, although I suspect that during the recent heatwaves, fridges and freezers had to work harder to stay cool during the afternoon. 

Last , while shifting consumption from the weekend to a weekday might help a participant to meet his target and get the reward, it’s not really in the spirit of the exercise.  It won’t help to squash down that lump on the demand graph.

Userlevel 7
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A few thoughts about the current Power Move challenge - limit usage in the period 4-7PM to 12.5% of the daily usage on weekdays.

I only have one month’s experience, so no specific tips at this stage. However, I have been keeping detailed tabs on my usage. The graph below shows my half-hourly weekday usage so far this month (red bars). I’ve highlighted the target period and marked the target I’m supposed to hit. (The alarming red 10AM spike is my morning electric shower, so not important in this context.)

I’ve also added two curves showing the gross demand for electricity across Britain, for yesterday and the day before, to highlight the weekday/weekend difference. Beware of the scale for demand: it’s fudged a bit to make the distinction more obvious.
  
 

 

The first thing that caught my eye was the fact that high-peak demand is about an hour later than the Power Move target, i.e. about 5-8PM. This will change over the coming weeks as lighting and heating come into play earlier each day, and there will of course be a step change at the end of British Summer Time. It feels as if we’re just practising for when it really begins to matter, when that high-peak demand could trigger power cuts if all the factors involved conspire together.

This also made me think that, if everyone defers using power until after the high-peak period, there might be an uncomfortable national spike as every light, kettle, cooker, TV and games console in the country is switched on simultaneously. My own 7PM bar illustrates this possibility.

Then there’s the question of carbon intensity - how much CO₂ is emitted by energy generation from time to time. This varies a great deal from day to day and from hour to hour, especially as the proportion of power from renewable sources increases. Any shortfall caused by, say, a lack of wind will normally have to be met by burning fossil fuels, pumping more CO₂ into the atmosphere. Shifting consumption to after the target period won’t have much effect on this, but moving it to earlier in the day when the sun is shining might help. Often, the time when it’s best to consume electricity from a carbon-intensity perspective will be quite different from the Power Move objective.

I can think of no compelling reason why consumption in the target period should be higher than it is in the wee small hours, although I suspect that during the recent heatwaves, fridges and freezers had to work harder to stay cool during the afternoon. 

Last , while shifting consumption from the weekend to a weekday might help a participant to meet his target and get the reward, it’s not really in the spirit of the exercise.  It won’t help to squash down that lump on the demand graph.

On the topic of carbon dioxide. I find this graph impressive of just how much less is being produced since 2012. Demand for electricity is down and carbon dioxide per kWh is down. 

 

Userlevel 6
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As a new member of this forum, reading back over the months of postings, I found I was a bit worried by the number of people feeling they had to switch off lights and their ‘fridges/freezers during the 4-7 segment of the day. This shouldn’t be necessary.  And there are loads of good posts pointing out why it shouldn’t be necessary. 

The way I think of things is this: the 4-7 slot is exactly 12.5% of your 24 hour day, thus, left to itself, your home’s “automatic” vampire and continuous stuff like ‘fridges and freezers during the 4-7 segment shouldn’t consume much more (and possibly a bit less randomly on some days) than the 12.5% target. This doesn’t depend really on how frugal or how relaxed you are with this “automatic” consumption like routers etc., as the 4-7 segment will never be more mathematically than 12.5% of the day.

It’s only when “human agency” consumption happens that the automatic vampire steady daily pattern is disturbed: and a lot of the human agency stuff is small beer: small stuff like extra lighting (only a tiny percentage, if you are reasonably efficient and careful with lighting), opening and closing fridge doors, switching on an LED telly, powering up a (mains connected) laptop, running the gas CH to stay warm or running the hot (gas powered) tap for the sink. Even if those inputs do happen in the 4-7 segment, they won’t have a huge impact: yes they’ll put you above the 12.5% target, but not by much. But we have to stay warm and comfortable and, as the dark evenings come again, have comforting and safe levels of lighting on stairs, and in the bathroom and living room etc. The thing about these low levels of consumption is to be as efficient and non-wasteful as is comfortably possible.

But any such increase during the critical 4-7 segment in what I’ve termed all this low-level consumption (and yes, it does mount up, of course it does) can very easily be offset and made relatively insignificant by using the “big hitters” like kettles, washing machine, iron, electric cookers/microwaves/air fryers consistently outside the 4-7 segment, and preferably moving some weekend activities to weekdays outside the 4-7 segment.  And of course normal low-level extra “human agency” activity outside the 4-7:segment will only help towards the target, percentage-wise.

A single weekday hour outside the 4-7 segment of using, say, a 2.5kWh oven might consume, say, 1.5kWh of electricity. More than enough to offset the three hours 4-7 of low-level activity amounting to less than 0.5kWh (for example, a CH pump averaging maybe 0.1 kWh, LED lighting averaging maybe 0.05 kWh, a telly and ancillary eqpt. averaging perhaps 0.2 kWh, any slightly extra ‘fridge/freezer activity). My own washing machine uses about 0.6kWh per cool wash, so a couple of those per week during the weekday segments outside the 4-7 segments will also go a long way, as will the usual daily 20-30 minutes of kettle-boiling (a huge 1.5kWh daily).

So please, folks, don’t go dark and cold during the 4-7 weekday segment, it actually will not necessarily contribute to achieving your target, as after all your effort and hardship you’d really be doing little more than matching the other 21 hours in the day when you’re either out of the house or asleep or whatever. Rather the trick is to shift as much as possible of our heavy hitter usage both from the 4-7 segment and, wherever may be possible, from the weekend as well, into any weekday segment that is not between 4PM and 7PM.  It doesn’t have to be all our heavy usage by any means (provided we avoid heavy stuff in 4-7 segment) maybe three or four things per week (on weekdays) might be enough.

We don’t have to increase overall consumption of electricity, that would be counter productive! Just *shift* usage from the silent non-contributory weekends or from the crucial 4-7 segments into weekday non-4-7 segments!

Sorry if I’ve been windy, but I’ve been a bit distressed by seeing how some folk have been discouraged or even have been causing themselves discomfort or distress. Don’t go switching off your ‘fridges and freezers (they’ll only need to work extra hard when you re-power them anyway) and for goodness’ sake don’t go cold or dark during 4-7, especially as winter comes back again.

The good news is that the winter Power Move (for Oct-Dec)  is slightly more generous, at an increased level of 13.5% for the same 4-7 segment.

Good luck to all of us, and together we’ll keep trying!

 

 

Userlevel 6

Wow @waltyboy 

 

Thanks for taking the time to share all of this information! 

 

I think this could be very helpful for others who are either already part of the scheme or anyone who may not be too sure about how they can reduce their usage during the targeted time. Some great idea of ways you can shift usage outwith the 4-7pm, while still being able to keep the low usage appliances on - as you say, we don’t want people having to switch fridges off.

 

Really look forward to hearing how yourself, and everyone else gets on with the new challenge!

Userlevel 6

I did a test to see what my 'on all the time' appliances were drawing, which may be of interest to others.

I switched everything off and then put each one on one at once to see what the IHD said they were drawing.
The IHD itself was unplugged and running on batteries. But I did test it plugged in and it shows itself as using 1 Watt.

Always on:
  4 W - Smoke/CO2 Alarms. Mains powered and obviously can't be turned off.
Note that that 4W has been taken into account and deducted from the readings to give the following figures.

11 W  - BT Smarthub2 + attached SSD drive.

Automatic on/off.
 85 W - Combi Boiler running fired. 70 W pump only not fired. 3 W on standby.
 90 W - Fridge Freezer when the compressor is running.

On for most of the day (12 to 16 hours):
 32 W - Laptop, in use (streaming a Youtube video), plugged in and on mains power, battery fully charged.
      I have 2 laptops, both 8+ years old and both draw about the same 32 W.

I have 8.5 W LED lightbulbs throughout.

I don't have a TV in use, if I want to watch things I’ll use the laptop.

I didn't test the big high wattage hitters hitters, things that you have more control over when you use them like the kettle, electric cooker, air fryer, microwave, washing machine, or vacuum cleaner.
You should know what those use, or check your own using your IHD.

Userlevel 6

Thanks for sharing @Nukecad 

 

It’s sometimes easy to forget about things like the smoke/CO2 alarms now that a lot of homes have the interlinked systems, so it’s interesting to read about their power usage.

 

Have you been able to meet the Power Move targets so far while these things have been on?

Userlevel 6

 

Have you been able to meet the Power Move targets so far while these things have been on?

 

As I only managed to enrol in the Autumn Challenge yesterday (after a struggle, see other thread) I haven’t been trying or actively monitoring it as of yet.

Userlevel 6

As a new joiner of Power Move, and a low electricity user, I've been considering how best to meet the target.


Here are my thoughts for what they are worth.

The Autumn Power Move target is to use less than 13.5% of weekday electricity between 16:00 and 19:00.

Everyone has a 'Background load' - things that you can't or don't want to switch off and which run all day.
Mains wired smoke alarm, fridge/freezer, boiler on standby, internet hub, etc.

The increase in the target to 13.5% means that if only the background load was in use all day then the target would easily be met.

The challenge then is the higher wattage appliances that you use above your background load.
Any extra appliance usage outside of those 3 hours will reduce that percentage used in the 3 hours, helping to keep you on target.
Any extra appliance usage above your background use within those 3 hours will increase the percentage used in the 3 hours, risking taking you over target.

If you do use a non-background appliance within the 3 hours then you have to compensate by using 6.5x as much again outside of those hours to get the percentage down again.
ie. If you use 1 kwh during the 3 hours then to keep on target you have to use 6.5 kWh outside of them. 7.5 kWh x 13.5% = 1 kWh.
or to put it another way; if you use 6.5 kWh outside of 16:00-19:00 then you can use 1 kWh within those hours and still stay on target.
(For mathmaticians, yes I know but I’m keeping it simple to understand).

If like me you don't normally use that much electricity anyway then the only realistic way to meet the target is to not use high wattage appliances during those 3 hours.

Shedding background load during the 3 hours, eg. turning off the fridge for 3 hours, won't help much at all and probably isn't worth it.
As a (very) rough example:
My fridge/freezer uses about 90 W when running, lets say that it runs a quarter of the time. That would be 0.023 kWh or 0.069 kW used for the 3 hours. (or saved by switching it off).
Say your kettle is 1 kw, say it takes 5 mins to boil one cup, = 0.083 kW used.
So just using the kettle to boil 1 cup during the 3 hours has more than wiped out any saving made by turning off the fridge.

What can low electricity users do to meet the target?
Basically if you are a low electricity user then it's just a question of not using high wattage appliances during the 3 hours.

My plan is as follows:
Obviously don't use washing machines, dishwashers, vacuum cleaners, showers, irons, power tools, etc. between 4 and 7.

The big hitter here is going to be cooking by electricity, whether that's a cooker, microwave, air fryer, slow cooker, etc.
Don't cook using electricity between 4 and 7. Cook and eat meals at different times.
If hungry between 4 and 7 then have a snack till later. Have a sandwich, salad, biscuits, etc. something that doesn't need cooking.
Have cold drinks, or get into the habit of making a flask of hot water to use.
(Tip: consider a small 1-ring gas camping cooker for boiling water for tea or coffee between 4-7).

Although it's not going to save much power during the 3 hours I also plan to get rechargeable room lights and have those, and my laptop, plugged into timer plugs that will knock the mains power off for the 3 hours so that they run on battery.

I will also have a timer plug for the kettle, simply so that I don't forget and switch it on between 4-7 without thinking first.

Of course each timer plug is going to draw about 1 W on it's own, but that's just more background use (2x 1 W timer plugs should currently cost about 40p a month to run on standard tariff, more than paid for if you hit the target and get £15 off your bill).

You can also move tasks like washing, ironing, vacuuming from weekend to a weekday so that they then count in the weekday off-peak use for Power Move.
But note what I said above, it takes 6.5 kWh used outside of the 4-7 timeslot to make up for 1 kWh used within the slot.

Lastly I'll consider turning off the central heating between 4 and 7, again though for the electricity that will save during the 3 hours it may not be worth it.
(Maybe off 4-5, on 5-6, off 6-7 would be a reasonable compromise?)

 

Userlevel 6

Thanks for sharing this @Nukecad 

 

That’s a very interesting read and I look forward to hearing how you get on through out the challenge, along with any amendments you make along the way. 

 

I know you’re definitely not alone in being a lower electricity user, so I’m sure this will also help some others with ideas of how they can still meet the target too!

Hi Guys,

I notice a lot of people here are struggling to try and hit the power move target and so I thought I would share my experences with the group to hopefully help more people to become sucessful.

I have been doing the “power move” events for the past few months and have always hit target, here are my thoughts and how ive made it possible.

This event wasn’t designed or ment for people to turn off their essential appliances during these hours (4-7pm mon-fri), but to lower/stop wasting energy by not using hungry appliances during this time (i.e move outside of this window).

I personally haven’t made many changes to make this happen, for example, I live in a energy only home, which in short means my heating and hot water is fed by electric only (I have no gas).  What I have been doing is stopping cooking during these times as cooking is usually one of the biggest causes for big electric usage.  Remember you stil can use the microwave, despite what some people say during this time as while the microwave maybe 1kw (roughly), you usually only use it for a few minutes at a time and is no where near the time you use say use the oven (as you need to heat up for between 7-10 mins on avg) before you even start cooking for your 25-45 mins or whatever.

For example, using a 1kw microwave, for five minutes, would only cost around 2 pence to run.

Kettles also are generally quite inefficient.  They are typically between 2 and 3 kw and can take a couple minutes to boil depening on water amount etc.  If you can, its better to buy a kettle which only boils what water you need (i.e cups worth) at a time.  They tend to be called instent kettles as its near instent.  This uses a lot less power overall (yes power will spike, but its brief, usually seconds).  You also can use the microwave if you don’t have a special kettle which is also quite ecconimical. 

FYI, OVO are not saying, “stop cooking, stop drinking hot drinks, during these times” they just saying, use electric more efficently.

If you do need to use the oven on that day, what I tend to do is cook in the morning, as I have eco 7, I have cheap power between 00:30 UTC and 07:30UTC.  As its still BST until end of the month, this actually means 1:30AM until 8:30AM its cheaper.  During these hours, usually at/around 7AM, I do my cooking for the day (use oven etc) and then either have it cold in the afternoon/evenings or use the microwave for a few minutes to heat it back up (avg 2-5 mins use).

As for washing, washing machine for example is quite hungry and varies on if you use cold or hot cycles (plus manufacture/model).  However generally speaking, they can cost quite a bit to run.  Its best to use these appliances on their timmer function (if yours has this, which most do these days).  Set it to use outside of this window or when your power is at its cheapest.  I tend to do mine at/around 2-3AM and by time I wake up in the morning, its all done.  I tend to program mine up just before bed or a little earlier, so I don’t forget. 

Washing clothes also can be optimized, the cooler cycles of around 30 degrees is best for most clothes, however under some cirstances, the cooler wash wont be sufficient but under most cases, it will be.  Do remember, if your using a cooler wash like 30 degrees (like I do), to buy suitable washing gel/powder.  For example Fairy makes one which is designed for cold washes and this works well.

Drying clothes costs even more then washing, so if you have a washer/dryer, make sure you use outside of this window or at chpaaer electric costs.  However, better still if you can, get an indoor clothes drying wrack or put them outside when they are done (most ideal).  Drying clothes does work well indoors, but can take a couple of days and you need to be careful that your house dont get too humid or mold can build up.

Lastly, if you have a dishwasher (who doesn’t), check if you have a timer program on there (most do).  What I do is, put my dishes in, when its full (that evening), I use the eco wash (the coolest) and set the timer to start in my cheap period.  Of cause if you don’t have eco 7, just set it for any time outside of the 4-7pm mon-fri window.

I hope these tips helps you to meet your targets.

I would also suggest people take a read of the following site which is the best electric caculator that I know to give people more of an idea of how much their appliances are really using.  Do remmeber the IHD is not real time, its about 30 seconds or so delay, so your better getting a smart monitoring plug which has power usage/graphs or a metter you can plug into the appliance if your intrested finding out more.

https://www.sust-it.net/energy-calculator.php

Kind Regards

Simon

Hi I thought I’d let everyone know I succeeded in the power move easily all I had to do was turn are plasma tv off between 4 and 7 if know one was watching it which is most of the time between these hours as there always on there phone’s and iPads mostly during these hours I ended up getting it down to 10% of my usage and I never put the car on charge between these hours now I’ve just realised I need to get rid of that plasma tv as soon as these 3 months  are over

Userlevel 4

Hi I thought I’d let everyone know I succeeded in the power move easily all I had to do was turn are plasma tv off between 4 and 7 if know one was watching it which is most of the time between these hours as there always on there phone’s and iPads mostly during these hours I ended up getting it down to 10% of my usage and I never put the car on charge between these hours now I’ve just realised I need to get rid of that plasma tv as soon as these 3 months  are over

Charging your car outside the hours will really help you up your out of hours usage making it easier to get below the 13%.

We have also managed it easily last month with just over 8%. During the hours we only use TV lights and central heating (maybe plug on laptop if low battery). We just moved all the washing from the weekend to mornings and dryer to after 7 (it is a condenser dryer so also heats the house a bit which is a bonus). 

 

Userlevel 2
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It’s easy for some and not for others

I have solar panels so a lot of what I use during daylight hours is what I generate. All OVO see is that I’m not using much until sun goes down at about the time the power move kicks in. It is near on impossible for someone with solar panel and no battery storage to meet the target even though they are probably using less during the power move window, just not importing less. 
 

Fortunately I still managed to hit my target because I have an electric car that charges outside of the power move window and makes the other energy used look very small. 
 

Userlevel 5
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To be realistic without a single large demand on power that you can keep out of the peak hours (an EV in my case) I wouldn't be able to meet the challenge. Another way would be to preheat the house with a heat pump and ‘coast’ through the peak hours or have a heat pump and have a secondary form of heating like a wood burner stove.

 

One comment that I've seen above is to move heavy use from the weekends (that don't qualify) to the week and keeping it out of the peak. I've now stopped charging at the weekends unless I really have to. It's sort of gaming the system but it still meets the rules.

 

Something that might engage more people and raise awareness about peak use would be to have graduated targets from 20% downwards with increasing rewards for lower use but keep it simple though. There are some maths behind that but there are diminishing returns at the lower end. If there were lower targets I would probably have a go at reaching them though if only to see if I could do it.

 

Peter

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We try and use when the sun is out so we are using solar energy ,and don't use between 4pm and 7pm.

Userlevel 2

Unfortunately I don’t have solar. 

I'm lucky as I live in a retirement complex and we have a laundry room so I just stick to my times for using it.  Also I only turn items in when I absolutely need them.  I batch cook during the day and then reheat my dinner but try to eat after 7pm.  If I eat earlier I use my Ninjas or microwave for cooking, I don't have an oven and I very rarely use my electric hob. The trick is to turn everything off if your not using it. Don't forget you can set budget targets in your smart meter.

Userlevel 3

I am lucky in that I live alone so can make changes that only affect me. I use rechargeable battery lights during the period (which are brighter than energy saving bulbs) and listen to the radio or watch TV via the laptop or ipad. I prepare dinner and cook it at 7. I gained maximum discount for the months I have been signed up. Not sure how the really cold months will go as Ive only used the heating once so far thanks to my Sherpa fleeces! Its worth the hassle I am 11 days into this billing period and my bill is £2.25 so far. The annoying thing is the standing charge is more than my energy charge

Userlevel 5
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Unfortunately I don’t have solar. 

Paradoxically, solar power without a battery makes it more difficult to hit the target. If you use solar power off-peak it makes the in-peak use percentage higher. The only way that solar power can help you meet the target is to use the off peak solar to charge a battery and then use the battery during the peak hours. However, solar plus battery is an expensive item and if you don’t already have it (I don’t have either) it won’t pay to get a system just to get the discount for reducing peak usage. It also doesn’t guarantee you will meet the peak discount criteria either. You’re not missing out.

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