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The surprising benefits of switching to V2G with OVO

  • 8 January 2020
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The surprising benefits of switching to V2G with OVO
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@Leo Moran once had a number of fuel-guzzling vehicles, including a Land Rover. But when he bought a 30kWh Nissan Leaf three years ago – in a conscious effort to improve his energy efficiency – he was surprised by how fun it was to drive.

 

“I enjoyed driving the electric car so much, not to mention the dramatic reduction in running costs. I got rid of the Land Rover and Alfa Romeo, neither of which had moved out of the garage in a year, followed by the motorcycle a year ago.”

 

When Leo bought the updated 40kWh Nissan Leaf two years later, he decided to make the car work for him as more than just a way to get around. Through V2G (vehicle-to-grid) technology, Leo now makes money from his car when it’s sitting in the garage.

 

“I had my V2G charger installed in the garage. As well as a £75 credit for initial sign-up, I get 30p for every kWh I export to the grid, which is a profit of more than 10p for every kWh.”

 

Leo’s taking part in the V2G trial – a collaboration between OVO Energy, Nissan and 2 other companies. With the trial, Nissan Leaf owners can export energy stored in their vehicle back to the national grid – and get paid for it, too. Current energy plans pay 26p/kWh (solar) and 30p/kWh (non-solar) for people’s energy exports. So it’s a good deal for the grid, and for V2G trial participants like Leo.

 

“The improvements to household efficiency reduced my running costs by a third. However, I was continuing to pay my old rates. This meant that I was overpaying, so I now have a tidy sum in credit – which OVO Energy pays me interest on (1). Also, at the end of the trial, I can pay just 1p to keep the £5,000 charger.” 

 

More cash in your pocket

 

Earning money through your car might sound too good to be true, but Leo’s been pleasantly surprised about the financial perks of V2G.

 

“The credit for the energy you export is paid a month in arrears. Last month, the credit exceeded the amount I spent in gas and electric for the house and car – this meant I received a credit of £28. The credits and interest will leave my payments over a year in advance, so my gas, electricity and fuel bills for the car will all be free.”

 

Want to know how much you could save by taking part in our V2G trial? Our team can take you through our savings calculator to help you estimate how much you could save based on your current energy use. If you want to learn more about the trial and how we calculate your savings, give us a call on 0330 102 7423 or email v2g@ovoenergy.com.

 

V2G couldn’t be simpler

 

Using your new vehicle and V2G charger is a doddle. Take it from Leo.

 

“When I’m not using my car, it’s in the garage and plugged into the grid. This means electricity can flow both ways – topping up when there’s lots of electricity and exporting to the grid when there’s not.”

 

Your V2G charger gives you total control. You can personalise how much energy you want to export, and how much energy you want to keep in your battery. It’s easy to set up and change anytime with the Kaluza web app. Leo uses the app to set when he needs to have 100% battery charge available. 

 

“The charger software calculates how long it will take to charge to 100%, and stops exporting at this point.”

 

Leo’s also discovered a hidden benefit of charging the electric vehicle.

 

“The heat in the battery not only gives me a warm and toasty garage to work in throughout the year, but also ensures the car is both warmer in winter and at the optimum temperature for efficiency. My consumption has improved from 3.5 miles per kWh to 4.5 miles per kWh.”

 

One big concern of V2G critics is the potential impact of cycling the battery charge level on such a regular basis. However, Warwick University research suggests it actually has a positive effect. Leo’s been keeping close tabs on his car battery health.

 

“I’ve monitored the battery daily (initially – I soon got sick of it!) and compared with previous running, the battery appears to be degrading at a slower pace. The constant charging and discharging seems to be good for the battery’s health.”

 

Just plug in

 

Although V2G is a planet-saving technical marvel, your part is simple. Just plug in.

 

“There’s nothing else to do other than plug the car in every time you get in and unplug it when you go out. Everything else is done for you.”

 

If you’re a Nissan Leaf owner and interested in joining our V2G trial, head to ovoenergy.com/v2g and we’ll set you up. It’s your chance to join Leo and over one million OVO members on their journey to zero carbon – simply by charging your car.

 

1 Interest Rewards are paid on credit balances of customers paying by monthly Direct Debit. It is calculated at 3% in your first year, 4% in your second year and 5% in your third year (and every year thereafter) if you pay by Direct Debit. Interest Rewards are paid monthly based on the number of days you’re in credit and the amount left in your account after you’ve paid your bill. Full terms apply.


4 replies

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Many thanks to @Leo Moran for sharing his #OVOSuccessStory with us!

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One big concern of V2G critics is the potential impact of cycling the battery charge level on such a regular basis. However, Warwick University research suggests it actually has a positive effect. Leo’s been keeping close tabs on his car battery health.

 

“I’ve monitored the battery daily (initially – I soon got sick of it!) and compared with previous running, the battery appears to be degrading at a slower pace. The constant charging and discharging seems to be good for the battery’s health.”

 

I want to get @D10hul involved in this ^^^

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Hi all 

 

yes I can certainly say V2G has improved the battery health, I have well documented it with backup information. 
 

I have been documenting my battery health information monthly before and after the trail started, the vehicle I have documented is a UK built 2013 24kw, this vehicle has strong battery technology along with a over engineered battery layout and management system compared to the rest of the Nissan EV range. 
 

anyway enough of that, the car going into the trail has like most other 2013 leafs a strong SOH for its battery, 90% and 33k miles, 3 months into the trail and another 4K miles under its belt and the SOH is sitting at a solid 92% give or take, critics at the time pointed out it was cold temperatures improving etc etc so a few weeks later we had a mild spell and I re -took the readings at a battery temp of 15c instead of the initial 6c and the SOH was almost identical.

the true impact on the battery SOH will be yet to be told however the trial started in October for me and I have been noting miles and SOH on the vehicle since June 2019 so I guess that June will be the true comparison time. But as yet I seen a monthly increase in SOH, it has now stabilised at what I suspect is it’s best, I am hoping to se a slow reduction in SOH, slower than I would and have calculated if I do not use V2G. 

i expect, if I had not have used the car on the trial to be at around 87% then due to the mileage but we will see, I estimate seeing a reduction on the current value to 90% were I started from, however that will be a battery pack of 7/8 years old with over 45k miles  on the clock, I know of cars in a much worse state half the age and miles !! 

the main reason the V2G is good for A power pack is due to the slow cycles and it not holding the pack at a high or low state for a length of time, which can Damage the battery, along with heat, charge state is the top of the list for battery killers 

There is my 2pence worth, I would have pulled the plug pardon the pun if I had seen a issue with my battery health !! 

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Thanks for the detailed comment @D10hul - much appreciated. I’ve been following yours and Graeme’s reports on the V2G Group and can’t wait for us to have some long term data to get stuck into. Seasonal variation is of particular interest to me!

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