How has having a smart meter helped you?



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Userlevel 6
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@Chick Lunchbox Here's our page on SMETS2: https://www.ovoenergy.com/guides/energy-guides/smets-1-and-2-new-smart-meter-generation.html

@Kelseycamm it sounds like a meter accuracy test is needed if your meter is clocking too fast. With the results, we can work out how much it's clocking fast and adjust your billing accordingly. It's very rare to have this issue, especially with new smart meters, so once you've had the old meter tested, go for a smart meter ASAP!

@AngeD such a shame to hear about this. That £700 bill sounds like it's for more then 1 months usage. If we didn't have readings from the old meter, maybe it's a catch up after some underestimating? Please reach out to our Care team to get this checked. We're on Facebook, Twitter or email: hello@ovoenergy.com. Just to add, I can see you've flagged this topic to us. Please note this feature is intended for users to report inappropriate content, and us moderators can then remove it from the forum. We'd ask that you only use the flagging feature for this reason.

Hope this helps,
Tim
Personally, I'm far from happy with my "Smart" meter. Whereas with my previous supplier someone came round every three months to read it, with no input from me, I'm now requested by Ovo to read it myself monthly and email it to them, with simply a bald explanation that "we're not receiving readings from your meter". I can't even use the "handy" indoor monitor to take the readings, as that usually sits there simply saying "connection lost". Not only that, but when it IS working, it often shows completely bizarre usage readings of something like £3000 per HOUR.

Are these things going to be the next mis-selling scandal?
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Sorry to hear about this, @jnev52. The In Home Display isn't designed to provide your readings - you'd need to get these from the meter itself. It sounds like the same connectivity issue affecting your meters is also causing problems with your IHD. Have you been in touch with the team to diagnose the root of the problem?
No, I haven't, mainly because the "official" replies on the forum suggest that OVO regard it as nothing to do with them, and that the problem lies with some intermediary agency who's name I've forgotten.

If you think there's anything to be gained, I'll give them a ring, although not doubt OVO will be cheeky enough to say I've breached the terms of my "online management scheme", or whatever it's called.
Userlevel 4
That's not the case, @jnev52 we need to do a smart meter health check to see what's wrong with the meter. Usually the issue is easily resolved by installing an aerial or sending out a relay which will help boost the signal.

You won't lose your Self Service Reward (SSR) if you call about this.
Userlevel 7
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I echo what @Eva_OVO has just said, @jnev52

If you're having any difficulties in getting meter readings to OVO, then please say so here. There are several of us who may be able to help.

I once advised another Forum Member who physically couldn't get to his meter any more... due to having had an operation which meant he couldn't use stairs. His meters were in the basement!

So I don't think we'll mind however obscure the problem is. Just ask!


We think that smart meters are great at helping customers keep track of how much they're spending on their energy. What do you like about your smart meter? Anything you wish it could do but can't just yet?


Hi I think my main issue with smart meters apart from it being another wireless device is that to me it looks like a gateway to variable tariffs in the future. Variable tariffs will see power being more expensive at peak times which is of course when we all want to use the power.
Userlevel 7
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That's a very important point, @Pierssy . But I don't believe anyone has yet proposed it will be compulsory to switch to a half-hour variable tariff (called Demand Side Response in Government literature).

In my region (South West England) we are producing more renewable energy than it is possible to send back up the line to major cities. The Transmission Grid (above 33kv) cannot handle the current. As such, during times of over-generation, wind-turbines and larger solar-arrays have to be shut down. The owners are then financially compensated for the loss of corresponding revenue.

That's a crazy way to run the country's energy supply system.

Devon and Cornwall have high proportions of the population suffering energy poverty. Smart Meters are part of the system which we need to implement in order that these residents can be offered the electricity at low prices during the periods of over-generation.

That in turn means the rest of the country (like you) won't have to fork out the compensation to take wind and solar production offline. Thus network costs will fall.

The National Media headlines last month were heavily occupied with Extinction Rebellion, David Attenbrough's BBC Climate Change documentary, and Greta Thunberg. Public opinion is swinging behind more radical actions to organise energy differently than at present.

Too long has government permitted cosy relationships between the energy industry and its regulators. No longer is it acceptable to set out a 15 year plan to minimise energy losses, when it could just as well be done by 2022.

I think you are incorrect to presume that Variable Tariffs equals higher bills.

On the contrary, if Ofgem don't now take swift action to start implementing the energy-saving functionality which becomes possible with Smart Meters, then I think there will be uproar from customers, prevailing upon their MPs to get a grip on the energy sector.
Another great, knowledgeable response @Transparent!

I'm one of the new moderators on the team, and I've heard and seen a number of your amazing responses! It's great to see your informative engagement with other users and to know that they can come to you for a detailed answer to their questions!

I'm looking forward to seeing you around on the forum!

Cheers!
@Transparent
I second the response above, thank you for this reply. I am a great believer in responsible public ownership of utilities, while they remain in the hands of hedge funds etc then profit will always come first in my opinion. By the way I am in the South West and survive on a meagre income. The system you describe sounds interesting, and having renewable energy production going to waste is crazy, but the cheap energy for energy poor at time of over production sounds a bit ad hoc although not unwelcome. And not being able to send this power to where it's needed........
Userlevel 7
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Glad to see you plunging in here @Bradley_OVO. Because both you and @Pierssy live in the same geographical region, I'm about to give an example which exists close to you:

We don't have to wait for any further government legislation in order to take back control of our domestic energy supply system. The regulatory frame work already exists.

Last week I spent a couple of hours at a substation with some engineers from Western Power Distribution - the same DNO which covers your areas. They tell me that it is increasingly common for larger house developers to engage with a 3rd party to install and run the electricity distribution on a new-build estate. The DNO merely provides the 11kV or 33kV feed.

Even where there is an existing substation and housing, a community-run enterprise can take it over. They operate what is called a micro-grid.

One of the better examples is at Owen Square in Bristol.


You can download an informative illustrated PDF about this micro-grid here on the Regen website. I have already described the sub-station monitoring system in my Forum Topic about OpenLV here.

OVO's Kaluza Division have a number of emerging technologies which are ideally suited to sit within a micro-grid concept, including the Home Storage Battery and the V2G charger.

Moreover, OVO own the distributed-energy control system, Vcharge, with its offices in London.

It is VCharge with could provide the basis of a true half-hour (HH) Time-Of-Use variable-rate tariff system. It already has weather forecast input, and can be enhanced by receiving samples from substations with OpenLV monitoring across a region.

Where there exists over-generation, VCharge can be instructed to switch on devices to absorb this electricity, subject to a series of constraints configured by the end-user. These energy-sinks include
  • Storage radiators
  • Immersion heater
  • Washing machine/tumble drier/diswasher
  • Home Storage Battery
  • Electric Vehicle Charger
There are numerous possible methods to assign who might be offered the cheapest energy rates according to social demand. As a starter for such a discussion, let me suggest
  • those on the Priority Service Register
  • those receiving help from a foodbank
  • those receiving home care allowance
The key to make all this happen is the SMETS2 meter.

And that's why I'm dismayed that most people only regard it as a method of being able to switch Energy Suppliers. It is so much more important than that!
@Transparent Thanks again for your informative input, another world is possible.

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