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Can you provide a 3-phase meter?

  • 17 October 2019
  • 7 replies
  • 830 views

My house has a 3-phase supply but currently only one phase is metered and used (the other two phases terminate at the main supply fuses).  I’m refurbing the house and will need a peak supply >100A once I’ve installed electric shower, water heaters, space heaters, kitchen appliances, EV charging etc, even when taking diversity into account. (Electric-only house in the country, no gas, oil etc available.)

Can OVO provide a 3-phase meter as a replacement for my single phase meter?  I’m not bothered about a smart meter (I’ve read the other posts that these aren’t available anyway).

The circuits will split quite nicely into three groups.

Thanks.

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Best answer by Nancy_OVO 6 November 2019, 17:38

Hi @BigBulge,

Sorry for the delayed response here!

We can indeed provide a 3 phase meter - it costs £325 to upgrade or downgrade between single phase and 3 phase. Any alterations to the supply itself would need to be made before we exchange the meter.

Hope this helps!

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7 replies

Userlevel 6

Hi @BigBulge,

Sorry for the delayed response here!

We can indeed provide a 3 phase meter - it costs £325 to upgrade or downgrade between single phase and 3 phase. Any alterations to the supply itself would need to be made before we exchange the meter.

Hope this helps!

Hi Nancy,

Thank you for answering my query.

I’ll also be needing the meter moving location, and will arrange for the DNO to move the supply cables.  Can the move of the meter itself be included in the £325 upgrade charge?

Thanks.

Userlevel 6

You need a separate appointment, @BigBulge, to move the meter and it would incur a separate charge, more info here

Thanks! 

Hi,

I’m thinking of moving to OVO but I what to upgrade to 3 phase at the same time.

The trigger to want to move to 3 phase is several fold

increased consumption due to large extension

imminent addition of an ASHP ( we already have an Aircon system (inverter) and significant consumption

potential use of 3 phases garage equipment

High voltage (up to 255 volts), already notified to UKPN but we are at the beginning of the line from the transformer, so always going to be high. I can solve this with a power perfector but the technology only works on 3 phase

If moving to 3 phase is possible what tariffs are available?

I can wait for a smart meter until that technology is available for domestic use

Many thanks for your help.

 

Userlevel 7
Badge +2

Hi @mks56 and welcome to the Forum.

This is a big subject. But before we discuss it further, please have a look at what @Amy_OVO and I were writing in response to another customer enquiry about 3-phase metering in March’20.

And also this conversation during May about using a 3-phase Vector-Sum meter.

 

I note your report to your DNO, UKPN. So I presume you know the rule about the voltage needing to be between 230v -6% (216v)  and  230v +10% (253v).

I’m in a town where most substations have at least one phase bobbing around the maximum 253v. But this is due to it being raised sufficiently high that there is a minimum 216v available in a village peninsular about 5 miles away from me. It’s a tricky balancing act.

Phase L2, 30-min readings: average (red) and peak (orange) for comparison

I’m right at the end of a substation feeder, and I rarely see less than 250v.

 

Could you tell us a bit more about yourself please @mks56 ?

I’d like to know how it is that you have this depth of technical knowledge about your local Distribution Grid! :slight_smile:

Hi @mks56 and welcome to the Forum.

MKS> Thank you and thank you for the quick response

This is a big subject. But before we discuss it further, please have a look at what @Amy_OVO and I were writing in response to another customer enquiry about 3-phase metering in March’20.

And also this conversation during May about using a 3-phase Vector-Sum meter.

MKS> I did look t those posts and from that I gathered that OVO can install 3 phase meters but not yet smart meters but that may be coming soon

 

I note your report to your DNO, UKPN. So I presume you know the rule about the voltage needing to be between 230v -6% (216v)  and  230v +10% (253v).

I’m in a town where most substations have at least one phase bobbing around the maximum 253v. But this is due to it being raised sufficiently high that there is a minimum 216v available in a village peninsular about 5 miles away from me. It’s a tricky balancing act.

Phase L2, 30-min readings: average (red) and peak (orange) for comparison

I’m right at the end of a substation feeder, and I rarely see less than 250v.

 

Could you tell us a bit more about yourself please @mks56 ?

MKS> in my profile, I hope that was right

I’d like to know how it is that you have this depth of technical knowledge about your local Distribution Grid!

MKS> Regards my knowledge about our local grid. A few years ago I made a compliant about our voltage which was at that time around 267 Volts. DNO put a recorder on the line, agreed it was significantly above regulations. They mentioned that we were at the beginning of the line from the transformer and as you say it is a balancing act. The voltage was reduced to around 248 volts, so within regs. I think they said they tapped down on the transformer. Around a month ago I noticed at times that it had crept up again ranging from 248v-255v. So I contacted UKPN again and an engineer came out. He recorded 252.9volts where my meter registered 253volts (it doesn't do decimal). So I know my meter is accurate and the engineer said the voltage was too high. So I’m waiting for some action. Currently voltage is still up to 255v. Our power is overhead (we are in a rural location) and I can trace our incoming feed to the transformer which is on a pole in our neighbour’s field less than 100 meters away. So realistically we are always going to have high voltage which isn't great for electronics and im paying for 255volts but only using 220volts (design spec for most equipment as a result of the EU). That is also why I was looking at some form of personal step down to bring our voltage to a reasonable level and why I was looking at powerperfector (https://powerperfector.com/product/powerperfector/) but it is only 3 phase and the case studies look very promising in terms of savings. Granted some equipment will “benefit” from the higher voltage, eg light bulbs will be brighter but don't last as long etc. Heating elements will consume the extra power but again lifespan will be shorter. The extension I mentioned and the ASHP were the two main reasons for looking at 3 phase and possibly some 3 phase hobby equipment. I have been looking at 3 phase car hoist recently for example. Anyway, for the extension I plan a new separate consumer unit and now probably a third consumer unit for the ASHP. then a forth consumer unit in the garage. So yes there will be significant single phase loads on each phase and a requirement for 3 phase machinery. Without the 3 phase equipment I could probably run everything off single phase but I think that would be at times close to max capacity. I had a quote from UKPN to install a 3 phase supply at around £5K so not cheap but I think it is going to be the right way forward as we will also probably look at power generation in the future.

I think that is in a nutshell what we are planning. Our electrician has done the first fix electrics but suggests we make the decision about single or three phase supply before he connects it all back to the incoming supply as it will terminate in a different entry point

 

 

Userlevel 6

Hi,

I’m thinking of moving to OVO but I what to upgrade to 3 phase at the same time.

The trigger to want to move to 3 phase is several fold

increased consumption due to large extension

imminent addition of an ASHP ( we already have an Aircon system (inverter) and significant consumption

potential use of 3 phases garage equipment

High voltage (up to 255 volts), already notified to UKPN but we are at the beginning of the line from the transformer, so always going to be high. I can solve this with a power perfector but the technology only works on 3 phase

If moving to 3 phase is possible what tariffs are available?

I can wait for a smart meter until that technology is available for domestic use

Many thanks for your help.

 

 

It’s great to hear you’re thinking of joining us, @mks56, we can offer you a 3 phase supply you would be offered the same tarriffs that you see on our quote and switch page. 

 

I’ve quoted the best answer below which explains the upgrade process! :)

 

Hi @BigBulge,

Sorry for the delayed response here!

We can indeed provide a 3 phase meter - it costs £325 to upgrade or downgrade between single phase and 3 phase. Any alterations to the supply itself would need to be made before we exchange the meter.

Hope this helps!

 

 

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