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Smart meters SMETs1 or SMETs2?



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Hi @Allan - just to clarify: OVO don't need to replace your existing SMETS1 meter. It's only a software change that's required to enable it to handle SMETS2 protocols. The meter itself stays put.

And OVO have also announced that they will be doing the upgrade remotely via the secure link from DCC. No one should be attending at your location to effect any upgrade. If they do, and you have no prior notification in writing from OVO, report it to the Police, and tell us here!
Hi @Allan - just to clarify: OVO

don't need to replace your existing SMETS1 meter

. It's only a software change that's required to enable it to handle SMETS2 protocols

. The meter itself stays put.

And OVO
have also announced that they will be doing the upgrade remotely via the secure link from DCC

. No one should be attending at your location to effect any upgrade. If they do, and you have no prior notification in writing from OVO

, report it to the Police, and tell us here!

Thank you that’s great do you perhaps know when the software update is rolling out as I understand the SMETS1 units are not supported by many suppliers

cheers

Allan
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OVO have given a timescale of "by the end of 2019", which is pretty loose!

I have a strong preference for it being done during June-August and in stages across geographical regions. There need to be adequate contingencies in case things go wrong during the remote upgrade.

A failed link could leave a meter inoperable and the customer with no gas or electricity. Since the software will then be in a mess, it's unlikely to be able to receive a second attempt at downloading fresh code. A site visit will be required.

Firstly, it would be best if upgrades were done whilst the days are long and central heating isn't in use.

Secondly, since Meter Engineers are as rare as hens teeth, they could be moved into the relevant geographical region and put on standby. By contrast, a nationwide upgrade would mean engineers trying to attend at failed sites from Lands End to John o' Groats!

Let's hope the Moderators can pass this preference on to the relevant in-house team at OVO. @Tim_OVO ?
OVO

have given a timescale of "by the end of 2019", which is pretty loose!

I have a strong preference for it being done during June-August and in stages across geographical regions. There need to be adequate contingencies in case things go wrong during the remote upgrade.

A failed link could leave a meter inoperable and the customer with no gas or electricity. Since the software will then be in a mess, it's unlikely to be able to receive a second attempt at downloading fresh code. A site visit will be required.

Firstly, it would be best if upgrades were done whilst the days are long and central heating isn't in use.

Secondly, since Meter Engineers are as rare as hens teeth, they could be moved into the relevant geographical region and put on standby. By contrast, a nationwide upgrade would mean engineers trying to attend at failed sites from Lands End to John o' Groats!

Let's hope the Moderators can pass this preference on to the relevant in-house team at OVO
. @Tim_OVO ?

That certainly sounds like a very good plan and I would agree that once a software link was broken loss of communication at least would be an issue. At this time my meter seems to work smoothly and I certainly hope the Beta billing software is improved

Thank you for your time in explaining the possible course Ovo might take

Allan
Hi

Can you confirm your be no longer installing smets1 meter after the 15th March? Being these will no longer count to your installed meter target.
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Well @Stewieb rumor has it that from mid March, we won’t be installing any S1 meters for OVO customers in South and Central regions. Subject to availability, this indicates other areas will still have S1 meters, but this depends on our engineer coverage.

Book in your appointment here!
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Hi @Stewieb - I've just posted updated news on this issue here.
how do I know what generation my smart meter is?
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Hi @JMydd - I've moved your post over here where you should be able to find the info you need!
Which edition of smart meters is OVO currently installing?
I would email OVO about this but dont want to lose my Self Service Reward. I moved from EON over a year ago and was pleased to note my secure smart meter carried on working. It stopped working after a few months so I contacted OVO and ran their batch of diagnostic tests. Several months later after it was confirmed not working I was put on an ad hoc call list to have a booster installed as the meter wasnt calling home. Almost a year later no one has contacted me to have the booster fitted. I am now bored of submitting manual readings so want to get a new smart meter. If I ask for a replacement meter will I get a SMETS2 meter, I live in Newcastle upon Tyne?

Thanks

Dave
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Hi @sethmthomas and @djclark46 - I've moved your posts over here where you can find more information about this.
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Hi @sethmthomas It depends where you live.

Could you please fill out your Forum Profile. That's where I first look to find out basic information when I try to answer questions like this.

The North of GB are still having SMETS1 meters installed. This is due to the need to first upgrade the telecommunications links.

I've found out a bit more info on this yesterday in some very technical reports. I'll try to post a layman's summary on the Forum in the next couple of days. But feel free to ask further questions in the meantime.
I will wait until the SMETS2 becomes available in the South Wales valleys. Interested to know when this will be.
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As far as I understand the technological and regulatory constraints, @sethmthomas, OVO are already supplying SMETS2 meters in South Wales.

Since 16th March, OVO would no longer be given credit for SMETS1 installations in the south and central regions of GB, where the communications networks are operated and maintained by Telephonica.
Thanks for the information, I will make application for the smart meter soon.
As the cut-off date for 1st generation meters has just passed, if I request a smart meter now, will I be supplied with a 2nd generation meter?
Thank you
Stewart
I'm having a couple of new Ovo smart meters fitted on 28/03/2019 between
08:00 and 12:00.
That's fine, but if they're not the latest and greatest SMETS2 version then don't bother. Please don't send fitters of they're not going to fit SMETS2 meters, ok? Tom.
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I've now added a map of Britain and additional explanations of the Smart Meter Network on this other Topic here. Please check there if you want to know whether you are in a region where SMETS2 meters are being installed.
Contacted Western Distrbution and was informed that the energy supplier decides on which model smart meter is installed and not the distribution company.
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Hi @tom hardwick

I think you intended sending this message to OVO themselves. But you've actually just posted it on an open/public Forum. This is isn't monitored by OVO's Customer Service Dept.

It's possible to tell if you are going to get SMETS2 meters because they are being installed in South and Central territories. Have a look at what I wrote here on another Topic.

If you want to contact OVO directly, you can email hello@ovoenergy.com and provide your billing address and account number for verification.
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Hi @tom hardwick, @sethmthomas and @Stewart7 - I've moved your post onto this topic where you can find more info about SMETS2 👍🏼
For the benefit of @102057461, @dikahn and others, may I bring some clarity about the differences between these types of Smart Meter?

We currently have two different "species" in use: Advanced Domestic Meter (ADM) and Smart Metering Equipment Technical Specification (SMETS). It's not so much the physical hardware which differs, but the data communication protocols. That's why you can face incompatibility when switching suppliers.

Both of these current species are being used in a fairly primitive manner. They permit automatic remote readings to occur and we can have an energy monitor within the home. They can actually do much more. For example a meter can be switched from Pay As You Go (PAYG Prepayment meter) to a credit meter by your Utility Supplier. So in theory an elderly invalid in a snowbound house could be permitted to still receive electricity over a weekend whilst someone sorted out how to get a new prepayment card to them.

For obvious reasons, the data communications to/fro Smart Meters are encrypted and heavily protected. We don't want a hacker issuing a "DUIS Disable Supply" command across the whole UK!

The companies behind the Smart Meter technology have learned a lot from the initial roll-out, and have refined their thinking into a single updated protocol, which we know as SMETS2. But until it's certain that it is robust, secure and safe, it won't be installed. That's why @Lucy_OVO is correctly telling us that OVO is still testing.

We need a refined protocol because the energy market is changing. In future users might be offered the capability to decide how and when to use electricity according to a tariff structure which gives different pricing based on the "industry standard" half-hour (HH) slot.

Imagine you have a home with a 4Kw solar PV array (grid connected) and an electrical vehicle which permits bi-directional charge/discharge flow. Normally you'd want to allow your smart meter technology to charge your car overnight whilst it's cheaper. So you buy a tariff from your Utility Supplier which permits you to give that instruction.

However, on a sunny day you can have three more flexible options

a. Prioritise charging my car, then sell remaining energy to the grid

b. I don't need my car today, so prioritise selling my solar-energy to the grid

c. I don't need my car today, so take its stored charge and sell that back to the grid at a premium

This is not only beneficial to the end-user, but it also allows the electricity industry to better balance electricity generation by making best use of power made available to them locally.

So before SMETS2 meters can be installed, it's important that the industry is satisfied that the new protocols allow us the future flexibility that we're likely to need. And that's why we're being asked to wait until at least April.

I hope that helps.

Was it a good idea to tell any would be hackers to google "DUIS Disable Supply" command?
Or even tell them it is possible?
Before you go into that amount of detail, think about who might be watching. There are kids in their bedrooms all over the place, trawling the net for phrases such as that.
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Hi @Stewart7 ... wow, that's an old post of mine you've found!

Well, first of all, knowing what the command is called isn't going to get anyone very far. It's a bit like being told that a CPU has a command to multiply together the contents of two registers. You'd need to know a lot more than that before you could actually use it!

Secondly, the only party who can actually send commands to a Smart Meter is DCC. They alone have the capability to assemble the necessary data packet containing the ID of the meter and command. Even OVO couldn't put that information together for one of their own customers.

Thirdly, as I mentioned in the original posting, the data stream has to be correctly encrypted. And that gets audited by GCHQ, who know a thing or two about how to defend data from hostile actions!

Finally, the list of SMETS commands is widely published. Here it is on an independent Smart Meter public information site for example.
How do I tell what type of smart meter I have? It was installed 4 or 5 years ago.

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