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Food we eat and waste we leave behind - discussion on lockdown learnings

  • 15 September 2020
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Food we eat and waste we leave behind - discussion on lockdown learnings
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During the lockdown, we felt genuinely grateful to the essential workers who managed the essential home deliveries as we followed strict guidelines and avoided travel to the supermarkets.

We have always been a conscientious family, driven by reduce, reuse and recycle  principles. However during the lockdown, our food waste reduced further significantly. Value on hard to get commodity is quickly felt and appreciated. As a kitchen gardener, I have huge respect for the farmers and food growers who til the land for the food, which leads to our plates. 


One thing I discovered during the lockdown was oddbox which delivers food which is in surplus, or not sold in the supermarket either due to size or shape. We have been delighted with the produce and many of our friends appreciated the introduction (plus a free £10 voucher for the first order, pm me for a new customer link if you're interested). 

 

This made me wonder, what changes we are open to make to our lifestyle post lockdown? What positive impact we can have on the environment and sustain the changes as a family? 

 

As a community interested in net-zero I would welcome your thoughts and comments.

 


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This made me wonder, what changes we are open to make to our lifestyle post lockdown? What positive impact we can have on the environment and sustain the changes as a family? 

 

As a community interested in net-zero I would welcome your thoughts and comments.

 

 

A great opportunity to have a discussion on individual learnings, which we can all learn from if we so wish - thanks for posting @sylm_2000 

 

I don’t want to steamroll this discussion, but I have a learning from 2020 that I want to share. 

 

I can get used to anything

 

From supermarket delivery services and full lock down, to returning to the shops and office (occasionally), I have learnt that once-hardened routines can change whilst my thoughts, feelings and emotions adapt. I, maybe everyone, can get used to anything. 

 

It’s for this reason that the necessary changes to our lifestyles that I BELIEVE are necessary (to avoid catastrophic climate change and a bio-diversity tragedy), can be absorbed into our daily lives with little long term effect to our happiness. An example is paying more for meat and dairy (a likely outcome of an end to subsidies is higher prices) means you get used to meat alternatives, and see meat as a treat to be enjoyed, if eaten at all. This can apply to carbon taxes, tariffs on imports from high carbon emitting countries, a focus on local, seasonal produce etc etc. For those that say ‘we can’t change, look how much the world loves beef’ (or something similar), I say: you can used to anything. Let’s change now and start getting used to it!

 

I know of one techy that might be interesting in this topic from a technical solutions point of view, @Jequinlan 

Wasting food is bad for the environment - including the climate. We waste about a third of all food produced for human consumption. This wasted food has taken loads of fresh water, land and labour to produce. If it were a country, food waste would be the third highest emitter of greenhouse gases [pdf] in the world.

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