If you've purchased a car or EV, we want to hear from you!


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If you’ve purchased or leased a car or electric vehicle in the last 12 months, could you leave a comment below to share your experience, and outline how you went about researching which make/model to get? We would love to hear about how you came to a decision on your choice of car, as we know there's a lot of info out there to get your head around!

As well as this, have a go at filling in this poll to help us understand the experience of purchasing an vehicle:

If you've purchased a car, did you:


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Here’s the new Leaf in Gunmetal Grey, off to Plymouth to see the Grandkids for its first long run on Friday.

 

I have a Nissan Leaf 40KWh N-Connecta on order from my local dealer, who gave me a few £00 off the PCP price; effectively a lower monthly payment, as if I had paid a larger deposit. So, it's worth haggling. I might have gotten a few more £00 more off by using carwow, etc, but this way I have a local company to deal with, if there are any problems.

I'm on this forum because I intend to switch to OVO as soon as my current fixed rate period ends. I am very interested in a smart meter and Economy 7, and especially interested in the V2G pilot that OVO and Nissan announced. My car won't come until the end of September at the earliest, but probably late October, judging from other people who have ordered them. So, there is no rush to switch, and I suspect the lack of solar panels at my house - I am likely to sell it to move to something smaller in the next year - may make me less eligible to be part of the V2G scheme. This is a shame, because I would be interested in using the EV effectively as a peak offset battery; charge at economy 7 rates, then offer that power back to the grid, and to my own house at the 4pm-7pm peak of usage. Tesla Powerwall 2s and/or the Nissan battery options are something I definitely want, along with solar PV for my next house, and roof space and suitable orientation of the roof, are important for my next property. It is a shame that the Powerwall 2s on offer are 14KWh but the Nissan equivalents are only 6.5KWh for pretty much the same money 😞 Hence, me probably having to get one of each, rather than two of the Nissan ones. I'd love to be part of a V2G pilot, as one of the Nissan batteries and the car would be about right for storage capacity for my current house electricity needs, and a smaller property would probably be the same or less.
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The leaf is an amazing car to drive so I have decided to upgrade my Leaf; traded in my 40kWh Tekna for a 62kWh, got a good deal through Carwow with a £2,250 contribution from Nissan and the £3,000 Government contribution.

The dealer had a cancelled order so I’m collecting it next week unless we get locked down!

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@Peetee maybe surprising but as you say could well be the future! Did you feel as though you got all the information you needed to make your decision on the Hyundai website or did you look anywhere else?

@Absolute Zero that's really interesting - can you point me in the direction of any YouTube videos that you found particularly useful? Feel free to PM me!
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Hi everyone - thanks so much for sharing your experiences on this thread. While we're here and talking about buying cars, would love to get your thoughts, views, and opinions on something similar.... https://forum.ovoenergy.com/owning-an-ev-87/leasing-an-ev-from-your-energy-supplier-interested-2164
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After first seeing a BMW i3 over 18 months ago, I finally bought a second-hand one in July. Best decision ever!

I did loads of research and thought I’d wait until the updated Leaf arrived but was put off buying it by the battery issue (Rapidgate) as I do need to do longer journeys from time to time. I looked at Ioniq but decided that, on a PCP plan, depreciation was so much more in proportion than the i3. I also then started to think I would wait for the Kona but having checked this out in the dealer (regular ICE models) quality just doesn’t begin to compare with BMW.

I visited the EV centre in Milton Keynes and had a 20 minute drive of i3 an couldn’t believe how good it felt to drive - super-fast, incredibly quiet, loads of space and really comfortable...but the price!!!

In July, I was casually browsing the web and came across a BMW dealer in Warrington who was selling used i3’s at significant discounts. In summary, I got an i3 Rex for under £23,000 with only 1180 miles on the clock!! An incredible bargain as only 8 months old. I reckon the depreciation in that time has been 34% - huge but I’ve not suffered that loss. My car is effectively brand new, and on a PCP is cheaper than Kona, Ioniq, Golf and Leaf.

If you’re thinking of going electric don’t wait - there will always be the next model, the next best range, the next longest battery, etc... but if you keep waiting you’ll miss out on the joy you get from driving electric now.

I love my i3 and, at this stage, I’m hoping to keep it for many years - plastic bodywork, aluminium frame and carbon-fibre body also mean it’s going to be around a long time, too. It’s magical! Oh, and the range is fantastic and incredibly accurate. Full charge is 160 miles and this can easily be achieved whilst still taking advantage of that great acceleration. My average is around 130 miles per charge.

The only downside I can share at the moment is the shocking infrastructure on the motorways. I’ve yet to come across one Ecotricity point that works for CCS connections and, last week if I hadn’t had the generator backup that the i3 Rex affords, I would have been stuck. You simply can’t rely on Ecotricity ever working. Polar, in contrast, has always worked fine and I haven’t come across a Polar point which has failed. I think the government needs to look at the monopoly Ecotricity has on the motorways and give the contract to someone else (OVO?) as they are jeopardising the growth in EV’s by not giving the EV community a choice and competition on the motorway network.

If you’re thinking of going EV, don’t bother with hybrids, just choose all electric as they’re far more simple to service and maintain. Also, test drive the i3 regardless of whether you like it’s looks or not. I guarantee you will love it and I can’t understand why BMW aren’t promoting it properly in the UK.
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I decided to research online for electric one day after reading a road test review from a gadget-lifestyle website. The car in question was the BMW i3 and it intrigued me because the review talked about it from an all round point of view as opposed to the top gear type car reviews.
The more I looked the more interested I became and the benefits certainly looked perfect for my usage. This was about 14 months ago and the EV car market back then was not was it is right now in terms of choice and after weighing up all the options we decided to go and have a test drive in the i3. We went slightly further afield to a BMW dealership with a recommended and specific i-car section and employee. To cut along story short we had a 1hour test drive with the dealer (success) a 24 hours test drive a week later (even more success) and after a 3 month wait our car arrived and we have had since then many months of extremely enjoyable peaceful driving, both long and short journeys.
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Can you leave us a review of it, once it’s here? Like @ITGeek123 did here 

Will do Tim

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I've read about the Leaf single rapid charging issue in motoring magazines. The positive is that according to an acquaintance who has one of the old ones, Nissan offered him a normal car for his summer holiday as his Leaf wouldn't cope with the distance. Don't know if this still applies, but I found this in a pdf from Nissan by searching:
"4. USE OF PETROL OR DIESEL CAR
Subject to availability and at participating Nissan dealerships, Nissan will endeavor (sic) to provide you with free use of petrol or diesel car (‘Loan Car’). "
https://www.nissan.co.uk/content/dam/Nissan/gb/vehicles/leaf/product_code/1_carryover/owner_benefits/Nissan_LEAF_Customer_Promise_T_and_C.pdf


For me as a golfer, none of the normal electric (or hybrid) vehicles have a big enough boot. If the gear is not in a locked boot, it isn't insured.

My search for a new car involves huge frustration. I read reviews each month anyway, out of interest. It starts with online research of motoring magazines, paper magazines, then manufacturer web sites to get specifications (if available, and if in any sort of standard layout). Then it progresses to spreadsheets of features and dimensions (it has to fit in the garage alongside my wife's car). Then when I have narrowed it down to a few, I take my golf gear to dealerships to find that their quoted boot sizes are interesting, and include spaces you cannot actually fit normal things into, or have strange angles. The VW Tiguan only fits one set of golf gear if the rear seat is moved forwards on its slider to its maximum extent. But that leaves a 6 inch gap between the seat back and the boot cover, so anyone looking in can see my golf gear! Oh, and the back seat is now too small for anyone to sit on - so it would be useless for a family of 4 on a long UK holiday needing the big boot size. The Seat Arona and the Skoda Karoq are almost the same.

Sometimes you find at this stage that such and such an option isn't available, or not with that level of trim sir. Or that what it seems to say for an option isn't actually what it provides, or that there are two versions and you picked the wrong one. Or that a spaceback is SMALLER than a standard Skoda Rapid. Landrover mislead, quoting the size of a Discovery Sport boot TO THE ROOF, rather than under the cover, which is less than half. The dealer didn't know the capacity under cover in the boot, and even the manufacturer's help line could not tell me without going away and emailing me a few days later.
When you do buy a car, you find out how significant of a lie the old consumption figures can be. Like when I moved from a Skoda Octavia Mark 2 (lovely car, but the Mark 3 didn't fit the garage), to a Volvo XC60. Official Consumption figures increased from 47.9 combined to 62.8. Fantastic? No. Real life measured consumption DECREASED between cars from 45.6 to 37.5, measured over 3 years each and driving the same way. From everything I have read, EV real life range is nothing like the official figures, for the majority of users.

My recently acquired car is a VW Golf Estate, which - when I removed the 'higher' level boot floor and released 6 inches more depth - fits two sets of golf gear with trolleys (the Octavia once did 3). It happily took 4 adults in comfort with a week's luggage (but no golf gear) to Cornwall and back to North East England. It always amuses me how the VW Golf cannot fit even one golf bag with clubs in the boot, unless you take them out and put some in diagonally. Then there is no space for a trolley, which is needed by 95% of the golfers on our course.

During the process of buying this car, several of the dealers reckoned that the options lists would reduce dramatically as each variation had to have a new emissions regulation certificate. Many expected that there would be the current major trim levels within each range, and perhaps only one or two options within each, perhaps core and fully loaded. We shall see.

Astounding to me, several of the sales staff commented that many buyers do not even have a test drive of a car before purchase.
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My search for a new car involves huge frustration. I read reviews each month anyway, out of interest. It starts with online research of motoring magazines, paper magazines, then manufacturer web sites to get specifications (if available, and if in any sort of standard layout). Then it progresses to spreadsheets of features and dimensions (it has to fit in the garage alongside my wife's car). Then when I have narrowed it down to a few, I take my golf gear to dealerships to find that their quoted boot sizes are interesting, and include spaces you cannot actually fit normal things into, or have strange angles. The VW Tiguan only fits one set of golf gear if the rear seat is moved forwards on its slider to its maximum extent. But that leaves a 6 inch gap between the seat back and the boot cover, so anyone looking in can see my golf gear! Oh, and the back seat is now too small for anyone to sit on - so it would be useless for a family of 4 on a long UK holiday needing the big boot size. The Seat Arona and the Skoda Karoq are almost the same.


Wow! Certainly a very thorough process - thanks for sharing. If there was one thing that you could change to make it less frustrating, what would it be?

One thing?
I used to love the what car listing of all new cars, which had all of the specifications and statistics in tabular form, so you could actually compare. They've cut it down to an extent where it is next to useless.
For me, I think being able to test a car for a week, or at least a couple of days, even if I had to pay something. I can't rent a car because you don't always get the precise model, or even the same make as expected.
One thing I am finding far LESS useful than ever is manufacturer Web sites. They are now designed by people for whom clever and pretty is better than truthful and informative.
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I first had a test drive in a Tesla Model S which I adored but decided I couldn't justify the £76,000 that the model I wanted cost.

Did loads of research on line and decided to try the Leaf, firts of all I used Carwow.com to get a price. The two cheapest dealers were in Lincoln and Kings Lynn. Itook the details to the local dealer in Tamworth but the nearest they could get was £1,500 more!

So, I ordered on line via Carwow in mid February from the Lincoln Nissan Dealer and paid a deposit on a 2018 Leaf Tekna with a few extras which I subsequently collected at the end of April.

I have no regrets about the Leaf, Rapidgate doesn't affect me as the longest journey I do is Plymouth to one set of Grandchildren and we always stop on the motorway twice for coffee so this time for a charge and coffee.

The past few weeks my zappi charger has provided most of the charge I need from the solar panels, since the zappi was installed I have covered 2095 miles at a cost of 1.56p per mile as opposed to nearly 15p per mile from my previous ICE Focus
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Nissan NV200 SV Compact Cargo
Is the perfect solution. 🙂
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I doubt that you will be applauded on this forum for buying a diesel car 😞
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We went slightly further afield to a BMW dealership with a recommended and specific i-car section and employee.


Very interesting to me that a dealership has staff dedicated to EV sales.
Such a shame that every dealership of all EV manufacturers aren’t similarly set up.
Tesla of course is the maker that leads the way and I think other manufacturers should take a leaf out of their book.
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[quote=Absolute Zero]Tesla of course is the maker that leads the way and I think other manufacturers should take a leaf out of their book.That would mean changing their methods of making a profit and that just won't do......

Well the only manufacturer that is regarded as having a “Tesla Beater”, Jaguar and their I-Pace, has just reported a quarterly loss of £264million and an uncertain future.
It may be that Tesla will shortly announce a profit.
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Interesting feature on the Kona is the ability to set the maximum charge level. So if 60% charge is adequate for yourself then a slider is moved to that position and the charge stops at that level.Several interesting BEVs coming out soon but I honestly thought the 40kWh Leaf would do me as it's made in UK and is really well put together. As I said, the car itself is great. It's #rapidgate that ruins it for me.
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this means charge times are completely irrelevant for day-to-day use.But, some people (me) buy a car to be the complete package, replacing an ICE vehicle. This means that it should be capable of long journies when required. The 40kWh Leaf is not such a vehicle due to the ever slowing charge rate when consecutively rapid charging.

"Mainstream" purchasers want a vehicle for all seasons and there are now BEVs that fit the bill. The 2018 40kWh Nissan Leaf is definitely not one of them.
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[quote=davrosuk][quote=Absolute Zero] Respectfully disagree. It is a great car if it suits your purposes. I never said it doesn't suit a lot of people. But, I told the salesperson what I required and #rapidgate was never pointed out to me. Had I been informed of the drawback, I would not have bought the car. I would have continued the lease on the 30kWh Tekna and waited for the 2019 version WITH battery temperature management.

Nissan didn't come clean on this and are still denying there's a problem. THAT is totally unacceptable.
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I expect a manufacturer to be upfront and honest about any product limitations.It wasn't the sales staff as they didn't know about #rapidgate either. They were told that the 2018 40kWh Nissan Leaf was a "Go Everywhere, charge to 80% in 40 minutes" vehicle that could consecutively rapid charge. The sales blurb has now changed, but, I gather it still doesn't tell the whole truth.

I'll have another dig with the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008.
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what did you use when doing your research? Any sites you would recommend?I had a look at Youtube videos, Twitter and the manufacturers' sites.

The clincher for me was that the Leaf is made in UK as well as being well put together. I would not have bought the 2018 40kWh Leaf if Nissan had told me about the charging #rapidgate problem. I would have waited for a Leaf with a battery temperature management system, or, maybe even gone for the Hyundai Ioniq as it WILL rapid charge several times consecutively.
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@Absolute Zero that's really interesting - can you point me in the direction of any YouTube videos that you found particularly useful? If you do a search for 2018 Nissan Leaf you should come up with plenty. Lemon Tea Leaf does good information.
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[quote=Peetee]Tesla of course is the maker that leads the way and I think other manufacturers should take a leaf out of their book.That would mean changing their methods of making a profit and that just won't do......
Decided on an Inoniq BEV, Hyundai dealer told me a 9 month wait. Decided to lease , price wise it was a good deal with Drive Electric and I had the car within 3 weeks . I went for the top of the range SE trim and its an amazing car, comfortable, lots of toys (the chilled seats in this heat wave have been amazing) and in this weather I am getting a range of about 150 miles and it rapid charges in about 20 minutes. I would never go back to an ICE car, I am not on Economy 7 and according to OVO my 5 home charges in July cost me £7.16, well pleased. I had a Pod Point charger installed and I cant speak highly enough of them and Drive Electric were a great company to deal with. I have a smile on my face every time I get behind the wheel
Well impressed (and this coming from an Audi man) with Hyundai that seem to be getting to the head of the pack with EV's. Both the Ioniq and the Kona getting great reviews
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I researched and looked around which EV was suitable for my need at the time as well in my budget. The Nissan Leaf 24Kw was the best choice I have ever made. With the reliable Japanese build, I will be looking into upgrading the car to the Mk2 Leaf in a few years time when I have got my money worth out of this one.

Unfortunately, the sales team at the Nissan garage only had one Leaf specialist who luckily was at the garage when I was picking up my car as I did have a few questions in regards to the car. But all questions were answered and shortly after purchasing my car, Nissan had arranged for Pod point to install my charge point.

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