If you've purchased a car or EV, we want to hear from you!



Show first post

52 replies

Userlevel 4
Badge
Forgot to say that I found out last week that the Toyota Yaris Hybrid comes in at number 20 with a Next Green Car (https://www.greencarguide.co.uk/) rating of 30.3.
The ‘Next Green Car’ rating expresses a vehicle’s environmental impact as a score ranging from 0 for the greenest vehicles to 100+ for the most polluting. The score takes into account the three main greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane) as well as local pollution such as carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, particulates and sulphur dioxide. The impacts associated with the vehicle’s manufacture and fuelling are included, not just the real-world tail-pipe emissions.
That's a definite bonus for me.
Userlevel 3
Badge
I would love to have been between you and your eventual choice, which I am sure is a delightful car.
However, I would have wanted to know much about your daily useage and how often the need for a fast charge would arise over a year.

I note that you have downsized and that may indicate that boot space, in addition to that available in your car, may not be of enormous concern.
What range of an EV do you think is a minimum?
Userlevel 4
Badge
@Peetee my day to day usage is low, and there are plenty of charge points around locally for a once a week charge. But it's the weekends away, leaving work on a Friday evening and heading away from Manchester, often to mid/north Wales. Generally a radius of 100 to 150 miles, maybe eight times a year, winter as well as summer. On my budget I was looking at a three or four year old Leaf with a smaller range than the new models, and I eventually decided it just wouldn't have worked for me. As I said, I hope that my next car will be an EV. Boot size has not been an issue so far. I often fold the back seats down to transport anything that won't fit in the boot including furniture, camping gear and garden waste!
Userlevel 3
Badge
I am sure your next car will be an EV. If budgets allowed then the Kona EV 64 would allow you to travel to North Wales and back comfortably, Summer and Winter, with its tested,in the real world , range of 300+ miles.
( in a recent hypermiling trip the range in Norway was shown to be just over 500 miles)
Of course the car is new and pricey.
I think that by the time you are ready to make the change from your your Yaris the Kona and a host of other models will have emerged on to the used market, all with similar range to the Kona.
In the meantime enjoy your journeys to North Wales.
Userlevel 4
Badge
Decided on an Inoniq BEV, Hyundai dealer told me a 9 month wait. Decided to lease , price wise it was a good deal with Drive Electric and I had the car within 3 weeks . I went for the top of the range SE trim and its an amazing car, comfortable, lots of toys (the chilled seats in this heat wave have been amazing) and in this weather I am getting a range of about 150 miles and it rapid charges in about 20 minutes. I would never go back to an ICE car, I am not on Economy 7 and according to OVO my 5 home charges in July cost me £7.16, well pleased. I had a Pod Point charger installed and I cant speak highly enough of them and Drive Electric were a great company to deal with. I have a smile on my face every time I get behind the wheel

This is great to hear... £7.16 for your home charging - nice! Was there anything in particular that impressed you about Drive Electric? Also - what made you decide to buy your EV from them (as opposed to going through a dealership, for example)?
Userlevel 4
Badge
I have ordered from Hyundai the new Kona Electric.
It was secured via their “Click to Buy” system, which is presently having some teething problems.
There are some indications that they have been overwhelmed with the response, order
website opened on the 2nd August, and at the moment it seems that a lady is ploughing through the orders to confirm delivery dates


Hey @Peetee was there anything in particular that made you use the Click to Buy process, as opposed to visiting your local dealership?
Userlevel 4
Badge

I considered the 40kWh Renault Zoe but it's not made in UK and allegedly breaks the steering drop link after 20,000 miles. And, I didn't like the logo thingy on the seats.


Hey @Absolute Zero , what did you use when doing your research? Any sites you would recommend?
Userlevel 4
Badge
Unfortunately, the sales team at the Nissan garage only had one Leaf specialist who luckily was at the garage when I was picking up my car as I did have a few questions in regards to the car. But all questions were answered and shortly after purchasing my car, Nissan had arranged for Pod point to install my charge point.

Hi @ITGeek123 - can you tell us a bit more about your buying experience? Would you consider a more online route (like Drive Electric) with a future purchase?
Userlevel 3
Badge
@Hari_OVO
In relation to the KonaEV it was necessary to buy on line because that was the only choice offered by Hyundai for the first U.K allocation.

Hyundai had already gained experience of online sales via Rockar. It seems that Hyundai decided to end the arrangement with Rockar and set up their own in house “Click to Buy” operation.
I have only seen photographs and Videos of the KonaEV and so it may surprise people that I ordered without any trial or viewing of the car.
I believe it is how car sales will have to be transacted in the future if the retail motor industry is to survive. Tesla has not only disrupted car manufacturing they have also disrupted the manner in which electric cars will be sold and serviced.
Of course we are quite away from any major changes because legacy maker’s can’t afford to commit to EVs with all the consequences that would follow.
Userlevel 4
Badge
what did you use when doing your research? Any sites you would recommend?I had a look at Youtube videos, Twitter and the manufacturers' sites.

The clincher for me was that the Leaf is made in UK as well as being well put together. I would not have bought the 2018 40kWh Leaf if Nissan had told me about the charging #rapidgate problem. I would have waited for a Leaf with a battery temperature management system, or, maybe even gone for the Hyundai Ioniq as it WILL rapid charge several times consecutively.
Userlevel 4
Badge
@Peetee maybe surprising but as you say could well be the future! Did you feel as though you got all the information you needed to make your decision on the Hyundai website or did you look anywhere else?

@Absolute Zero that's really interesting - can you point me in the direction of any YouTube videos that you found particularly useful? Feel free to PM me!
Userlevel 4
Badge

My search for a new car involves huge frustration. I read reviews each month anyway, out of interest. It starts with online research of motoring magazines, paper magazines, then manufacturer web sites to get specifications (if available, and if in any sort of standard layout). Then it progresses to spreadsheets of features and dimensions (it has to fit in the garage alongside my wife's car). Then when I have narrowed it down to a few, I take my golf gear to dealerships to find that their quoted boot sizes are interesting, and include spaces you cannot actually fit normal things into, or have strange angles. The VW Tiguan only fits one set of golf gear if the rear seat is moved forwards on its slider to its maximum extent. But that leaves a 6 inch gap between the seat back and the boot cover, so anyone looking in can see my golf gear! Oh, and the back seat is now too small for anyone to sit on - so it would be useless for a family of 4 on a long UK holiday needing the big boot size. The Seat Arona and the Skoda Karoq are almost the same.


Wow! Certainly a very thorough process - thanks for sharing. If there was one thing that you could change to make it less frustrating, what would it be?
Userlevel 3
Badge
@Absolute Zero
In relation to the KonaEV I relied on Bjorn’s series
First here:
https://youtu.be/b-3_LO3Swlc

Sadly there doesn’t appear to be a facility to display video on this forum ( should be rectified to increase appeal) so the link above will have to do.
Part two follows the one linked and recently bjorn undertook an epic 500+ miles, yes that’s right 500+miles, hypermiling exercise in the KonaEV which is also available.
Userlevel 3
Badge
@Hari_OVO

I relied on the reviews and the video linked above.
I have never visited a Hyundai showroom and don’t expect to until my car is ready for handover.

Consider how now it is almost impossible to negotiate part exchange valuations because of the car trade’s reliance on auction houses such as BCA or Mannheim
Back in the day a car sales executive would rely on his leather bound copy of Glasses Guide to value a PX. Today the registration of your car is entered on his smartphone and within seconds a valuation is provided. Mostly that valuation is set in stone and only local marketing conditions are likely to cause a departure. End of sales period, need to achieve manufacturers sales target etc.
Userlevel 4
Badge
@Absolute Zero that's really interesting - can you point me in the direction of any YouTube videos that you found particularly useful? If you do a search for 2018 Nissan Leaf you should come up with plenty. Lemon Tea Leaf does good information.
Userlevel 3

My search for a new car involves huge frustration. I read reviews each month anyway, out of interest. It starts with online research of motoring magazines, paper magazines, then manufacturer web sites to get specifications (if available, and if in any sort of standard layout). Then it progresses to spreadsheets of features and dimensions (it has to fit in the garage alongside my wife's car). Then when I have narrowed it down to a few, I take my golf gear to dealerships to find that their quoted boot sizes are interesting, and include spaces you cannot actually fit normal things into, or have strange angles. The VW Tiguan only fits one set of golf gear if the rear seat is moved forwards on its slider to its maximum extent. But that leaves a 6 inch gap between the seat back and the boot cover, so anyone looking in can see my golf gear! Oh, and the back seat is now too small for anyone to sit on - so it would be useless for a family of 4 on a long UK holiday needing the big boot size. The Seat Arona and the Skoda Karoq are almost the same.


Wow! Certainly a very thorough process - thanks for sharing. If there was one thing that you could change to make it less frustrating, what would it be?

One thing?
I used to love the what car listing of all new cars, which had all of the specifications and statistics in tabular form, so you could actually compare. They've cut it down to an extent where it is next to useless.
For me, I think being able to test a car for a week, or at least a couple of days, even if I had to pay something. I can't rent a car because you don't always get the precise model, or even the same make as expected.
One thing I am finding far LESS useful than ever is manufacturer Web sites. They are now designed by people for whom clever and pretty is better than truthful and informative.
Userlevel 4
Badge
Hi everyone - thanks so much for sharing your experiences on this thread. While we're here and talking about buying cars, would love to get your thoughts, views, and opinions on something similar.... https://forum.ovoenergy.com/owning-an-ev-87/leasing-an-ev-from-your-energy-supplier-interested-2164
Userlevel 7
Badge +3
Well, we've now visited the dealer 40 miles away and decided to buy the 3-year-old diesel car I mention here a week ago.

Whilst a new EV was a serious consideration, there are still too many bits of the equation missing... some of which I have just made comments on in the thread referred to above by @Hari_OVO.

Moreover, in the rural Westcountry, there simply aren't the charging points to be found. Interestingly, our 40-mile trip to the dealership had to be substantially extended to visit other locations which we hadn't planned due to family considerations. If we had been driving a typical EV, it would be unlikely we'd have made it back home without finding somewhere to charge!

The car dealer also mentioned something else whilst we were test-driving the diesel - that the most expensive single cause of failure in a modern car is the Computer/Engine Management unit.

That set me thinking....
Is that still true of EV's?

And, if not, then why?
Is the computer system in an EV inherently more reliable because it's not controlling an internal combustion engine?!
Userlevel 6
Badge +1
@Transparent
Interesting about what the dealer said about the Engine Control Unit (ECU.)

I have also read that 90+% of ECUs removed from cars (which then work OK when a new ECU is fitted) are actually not faulty, the thought behind it being that the problem was probably a faulty lead or corroded earth which just happens to be fixed when the new ECU is fitted - interesting!

As for my EV, it's basically a big battery on wheels with an electric motor and a computer which is hopefully reliable 🙂
Userlevel 7
Badge +3
That sounds plausible to me, @PeterR1947.

I also own a dual-fuel VW with two ECU's (one for each fuel!). The main one was diagnosed as faulty by a roadside repair firm, and the vehicle was returned home at their expense under the terms of the contract.

My local VW specialist garage (not a VW dealership), checked the price of a new ECU at around £1000. The "fault" transpired to be an iffy earth connection at £5 :)

It still irks me that an ECU could cost £1000.

I realise that there are costs involved in environmental testing and rugged design... but the complexity isn't much different from an embedded controller in a washing machine or a Smart Meter.

That's why I'd be interested to learn if EV users have experienced ECU failures, and what that costs to diagnose and replace.
Userlevel 3
Badge
ECUs may fail but it is not a cause for much concern to the AA

https://www.theaa.com/breakdown-cover/advice/top-ten-breakdown-causes
I decided to research online for electric one day after reading a road test review from a gadget-lifestyle website. The car in question was the BMW i3 and it intrigued me because the review talked about it from an all round point of view as opposed to the top gear type car reviews.
The more I looked the more interested I became and the benefits certainly looked perfect for my usage. This was about 14 months ago and the EV car market back then was not was it is right now in terms of choice and after weighing up all the options we decided to go and have a test drive in the i3. We went slightly further afield to a BMW dealership with a recommended and specific i-car section and employee. To cut along story short we had a 1hour test drive with the dealer (success) a 24 hours test drive a week later (even more success) and after a 3 month wait our car arrived and we have had since then many months of extremely enjoyable peaceful driving, both long and short journeys.
Userlevel 3
Badge

We went slightly further afield to a BMW dealership with a recommended and specific i-car section and employee.


Very interesting to me that a dealership has staff dedicated to EV sales.
Such a shame that every dealership of all EV manufacturers aren’t similarly set up.
Tesla of course is the maker that leads the way and I think other manufacturers should take a leaf out of their book.
Userlevel 4
Badge
[quote=Peetee]Tesla of course is the maker that leads the way and I think other manufacturers should take a leaf out of their book.That would mean changing their methods of making a profit and that just won't do......
Userlevel 3
Badge
[quote=Absolute Zero]Tesla of course is the maker that leads the way and I think other manufacturers should take a leaf out of their book.That would mean changing their methods of making a profit and that just won't do......

Well the only manufacturer that is regarded as having a “Tesla Beater”, Jaguar and their I-Pace, has just reported a quarterly loss of £264million and an uncertain future.
It may be that Tesla will shortly announce a profit.

Reply