Goodbye fossil fuel stations, hello electric vehicle charging stations

  • 4 December 2020
  • 5 replies
  • 157 views

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It won’t be long until Fossil fuel stations will start to disappear and be replaced with clean renewable energy charging stations like this one.

 

What are your thoughts on this? I want to drive to this place and witness it myself.


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Hi @NinjaGeek 

There’s more to energy use than swapping diesel and petrol for battery power. Battery production (and recycling) and infrastructure upgrades are not pollution free. Solvable in time, but not to be ignored. Carbon neutral is fundamentally an engineering problem, not aided by hyping up simplistic ideas - if only it were that simple.

The current Dutch auction to be better by declaring UK will be a year or two earlier to ban fossil fuel or reduce emissions does not help. Without realistic plans they are just slogans.

Vehicles built in say 2025 will have a useful life to 2040 at least, since as car technology has improved so much. Many components are recyclable, another good development. At what point do you ban and scrap all diesel/petrol cars, wasting the energy that has been used to build and that needed to recycle? Not an easy question, but I suggest it points to a relatively long and well-planned transition period.

Domestic gas boilers are another issue, and more immediate for many people. Fuel poverty is a real issue in the UK – a disgrace. Unless the price of electricity drops significantly, banning new gas boilers from 2023 will aggravate it. And then there’s the cost (and energy) inherent in conversion. Ground source and air source heat pumps are not necessarily the answer for many properties, even if affordable.

Sorry of that sounds like poring cold water on your nice pic. Not my intention, but debate is needed.

 

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I’m setting aside space at the back of my orchard for a neighbourhood Tokamak Fusion Reactor. :wink:

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I enjoyed watching that, thanks @NinjaGeek!

 

 

Vehicles built in say 2025 will have a useful life to 2040 at least, since as car technology has improved so much. Many components are recyclable, another good development. At what point do you ban and scrap all diesel/petrol cars, wasting the energy that has been used to build and that needed to recycle? Not an easy question, but I suggest it points to a relatively long and well-planned transition period.

 

Yep this is a good point, @hecate - great to hear parts ARE recyclable and that this is being done. I hate to think of all of the many plastic and metal based shells pilling up around the globe. 

 

Another headwind to EV adoption is the battery supply chain, as outlined in this great video, cobalt is an issue

 

 

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@Tim_OVO Lithium supply is an issue too,. So it is not too early to think about battery recycling and refurbishment.

Economics will play a part as well. If a high proportion of the value of a used car is the battery, which it will be, then the value of a car with end-of-life battery will be very low. The risk is that the whole car would be scrapped.

What we think now about car resale values will have to be recast - which means an end to the current PCH structure which depends on high secndhand values at the end of the contract.

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I presume others are aware of the project to extract Lithium from deep-rock brine in Cornwall by Cornish Lithium?

So if we combine that with the abundance of renewable power in the region, I’d suggest that centre of the UK’s Electric Vehicle manufacturing should somewhere near Bodmin :hugging:

 

@hecate is quite right to draw our attention to Lithium. Its chemistry is particularly well suited to batteries with high current flow due to the small size of the atom.

The other alternative to be seriously considered is hydrogen fuel-cells. We’d use electricity to produce the hydrogen from splitting water. So, again, this is a process that needs a plentiful supply of energy.

 

It looks like the West Country is fast becoming the go-to place for innovation.

Let’s hope it doesn’t disrupt the local treacle-mining industries.

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