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Will OVO install a V2G charger if there’s already a charge point installed?


Hello all

I’ve just bought a new Leaf and am enjoying it immensely. Part of the reason for my purchase was Ovo’s announcement if the Vehicle to Grid charger. As soon as it was announced, I registered my interest in being involved noting I am thinking of buying an electric car. Now that I’m an EV owner I’m eager to know more.

The garage I bought the Leaf from can arrange for a 7kwh home charger to be installed for free. However, I’d rather not have a charge point installed if it means I’m not eligible for the V2G pilot this summer.

Does anyone know the details of the project or if Ovo won’t install a V2G if there’s already a charge point installed at home?
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Best answer by ellisbirt 8 June 2018, 13:19

Although charge point installers will advise against charging regularly the EVSE cable, it is no greater risk than running an electric heater.

I would use the EVSE and wait for OVO. An EV Charge socket can draw 16A or 32A from your consumer unit. Most homes cannot support two safely (you need capacity for other uses).

The 'free' socket is part-funded by a government grant. If the OVO trial failed and they wanted to remove the smart socket you should still be able to get the grant.

When I bought my leaf (second hand) the dealer gave me a contribution towards installing a socket.
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Userlevel 2
Although charge point installers will advise against charging regularly the EVSE cable, it is no greater risk than running an electric heater.

I would use the EVSE and wait for OVO. An EV Charge socket can draw 16A or 32A from your consumer unit. Most homes cannot support two safely (you need capacity for other uses).

The 'free' socket is part-funded by a government grant. If the OVO trial failed and they wanted to remove the smart socket you should still be able to get the grant.

When I bought my leaf (second hand) the dealer gave me a contribution towards installing a socket.
Userlevel 3
I am surprised that your decision to buy your car was based in part on the future technology of V2G.


PODPOINT, the charging company published this view which you may find interesting.

Vehicle to Grid (V2G) - Great, but is it viable?
Posted January 18, 2018 by Roseanne
The concept of V2G is to enable EV drivers to provide their stored battery energy back to the grid at times of high demand, potentially earning themselves a nice little sum.
At Pod Point, we recognise charging infrastructure has a role to play in mitigating potential grid impacts from the mass adoption of electric vehicles. We also recognise that while there are challenges, there are great opportunities.
One such opportunity is for electricity customers to move from the role of energy consumer to a hybrid of energy consumer, energy storer and even energy provider.
Great, right? Yes! In theory...
V2G is a hot topic in the EV industry and the benefits are frequently discussed. Now we’re not trying to be party poopers, but we thought we’d give our take on the constraints that are often overlooked…
Concerns
1. Implementation costs: The hardware required to support V2G system will make the charging systems more expensive. These costs could outweigh the financial benefits to the consumer, or at least make the payback period prohibitively lengthy.
On the other hand, V2G hardware costs are currently much lower than installing the alternative system, i.e. a fixed battery (e.g. a Tesla power wall) and this one of V2Gs key strengths. Though costs are falling fast, batteries are expensive. If you can use the one you’ve already paid for in your EV, then you can reduce your spend.
2. Standardisation: Currently only the “CHAdeMO” DC connector is capable of V2G, it’s not currently used in homes and it is not by any means a universal connector. If V2G technology becomes viable in the mainstream, there would need to be agreed standards between various OEMs. This consensus will be challenging to establish.
3. Increased battery degradation: Should a customer use their battery as both a recipient and provider of grid power, this will increase the duty cycle and may impact the viable life of the battery. This could cause the range of the vehicle to reduce sooner and negatively impact its residual value.
Pod Point notes recent research stating that use of the battery for V2G could actually improve battery longevity, by ensuring the battery is kept in optimal state (e.g. not sat “over-charged” for extended which can harm the battery). We are yet to fully understand how practical this battery life optimising V2G approach is and whether/how much it constrains the opportunities for usage - but there’s no doubt it is potentially a big positive for V2G.
4. Intermittent availability of EV as power source: The car will frequently be in use on the roads at the times when it would provide the chance for customer to make some money.
5. Alternative ways to gain benefits: Simply using high powered devices (e.g. washing machines, dryers, charging EVs) at night will provide savings in a similar way, with no significant implementation costs. Having a fixed battery at the home will provide all the proposed benefits of the V2G system with none of the systematic constraints – and the cost of these systems is reducing fast.
Summary
Many of the benefits for a customer to use a V2G system can be achieved with established and available load management systems, especially when combined with fixed domestic battery storage.
There are established battery systems on the market that already meet the fundamental requirements of battery storage that could always be available at a similar cost.
The complexities of the electricity supply industry would further complicate the take up and use of such a system.
Written by James McKemey, Head of our Insights Team.

Personally I wouldn’t want to be a guinea pig for the technology in the absence of a specific undertaking from both OVO and Nissan that if there is any premature degradation of the battery as a result of a trial the battery would be replaced free of charge.

Personally I am happy with the approx £200 cost of the private installation of a Rolec charger :

Userlevel 4
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I've paid for a Zappi smart charger from myenergi. I have still put my name down for the Ovo V2G trial offer as I believe they can be complimentary.
Great responses and enjoyable thought piece by pod point and given me more food for thought. I think I should clarify that I was always going to go EV it was just a matter of when.

I’m waiting for a call back from the V2G to confirm if I am part of the project.

I agree that a home battery would be a better option for the grid however installing a battery wouldn’t be practical at my property and cost prohibitive. I can see a fixed battery working better people who heat their home with electricity.

Great point on checking the t&cs on battery degradation and warranty. Will definitely check with Ovo on that.

I’ve also been wondering about the long term compatibility of the chargers. Its all very vhs Betamax at the moment. I’m hoping a standard is agreed soon.

In the short time I have been driving the leaf, I usually have 60-75% charge remaining at the end of the day which would give ample supply to return the grid. Especially as the car is usually parked outside from 6pm onwards.

I’m not so much into the v2g idea for making/saving money (I certainly don’t want lose any money) more so the support of the technology and renewables. I’m excited by the idea of the smart grid and how energy distribution will change in the future.

As an aside, I called my garage this week and talked about the charger and they proposed installing the charger at another residence such as a family member who I visit regularly. Unfortunately it can’t be installed at commercial premises.
Userlevel 3
@LouisII<br /> “In the short time I have been driving the leaf, I usually have 60-75% charge remaining at the end of the day which would give ample supply to return the grid. Especially as the car is usually parked outside from 6pm onwards. “<br />

I would be surprised if you would be accepted on to the trial because as I understand it if your car is only available at a time of generally low demand.
The Grid’s STOR (Short Time Operating Reserve) arrangements would be used for peak levelling if needed around the evening peaks.
I would have thought that V2G would be most useful throughout the day, if the cost to the Grid is competitive with STOR
Hey everyone,

Great discussion going on here! Hopefully some useful information to help answer some of those questions!

There's no issue if you already have a charger installed provided a) there is enough space to install a second charger and b) you're happy to make the V2G charger your primary charger once it arrives.

As the V2G is being installed through our grant funding, it should have no impact on your ability to claim the OLEV EVHS grant.

Cheers,
Emma
Userlevel 4
Hello Louise,

Regarding your concerns for the charger in the garage, I have both a Type 1 and type 2 charger. I have installed a multi fuse box and wired (professional electrician) both chargers into the fuse box. As long as I only use one at a time then the system will not be overloaded. The 7 Kw Type 1 charger was for my first Nissan LEAF but when I got the LEAF 2.Zero I had the second PodPoint 7kW charger installed. There's ample room on another wall to fit the V2G charger wired into the same fuse box and all I have to do is switch off the fuses to the devices I'm not using and leave on the one I am. In the unlikely event I happen to use two at the same time I have a trip switch in the fuse box in the garage and the main fuse box in the house.....plus another breaker for the mains itself. But to avoid this only one device will be switched on live at the fuse box.

As for the chargers you buy, they belong to you although the new V2G charger I understand will belong to OVO.

The good thing about having both chargers is, if I get anyone visiting who has an older LEAF or car that uses Type 1 only then I can still provide power for them to refuel.

Also to PeeTee, this whole thing is a trial and it's pointless only taking vehicles that tick a certain box. They have to take the bad with the good otherwise when rolled out the actual usage may be totally different from what was trialled. Likewise I probably wouldn't be ideal as my car is hardly ever out of the garage most of the time and so almost always available to the grid.

Userlevel 3

Also to PeeTee, this whole thing is a trial and it's pointless only taking vehicles that tick a certain box. They have to take the bad with the good otherwise when rolled out the actual usage may be totally different from what was trialled. Likewise I probably wouldn't be ideal as my car is hardly ever out of the garage most of the time and so almost always available to the grid.


i hope you are right but energy companies are having a tough time at present and in my view only commercially viable triallers will be accepted.
Userlevel 4
Fair comment...but this trial isn't being funded by the energy company but by The Government and perhaps Nissan. The facts have to be accurate because if it isn't viable the company could lose £millions.

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