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OVO Smart Charger Vs OVO V2G Charger - What's the difference?

  • 11 March 2019
  • 7 replies
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Does anyone have the spec sheets for the two chargers.
Would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
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Best answer by Hari_OVO 15 March 2019, 15:38

Hi @bsauce96,

Are there any specs in particular that you're interested in?

The key difference is as follows:

The V2G Charger is a bi-directional charger. This means it can send power both to your car battery, and then back out from your car battery to your home and the grid. The OVO V2G Charger will only work with Nissan LEAFs. It's got a max power output of 6kW (in both directions) - and is powered by the intelligent Kaluza platform, which means it will charge and discharge your car battery in response to grid signals, and comes with an app that you can use to set schedules and view your charging history.

The Smart Charger will power your car battery, but it won't send power back in the other direction. It has a max power output of 7kW. It is also powered by the Kaluza platform, so you can set your schedules and view your charging history. The Smart Charger will work with pretty much any Electric Vehicle, as long as it is eligible for the OLEV grant.

The Smart Charger is available now, free when you sign up to our EV Everywhere bundle.

The V2G Charger will be rolled out throughout the rest of this year.

Let me know if you need any more details!

Thanks,

Hari
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Userlevel 7
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Good question @bsauce96 I've asked @Hari_OVO to give us an answer to this one!
Userlevel 4
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Hi @bsauce96,

Are there any specs in particular that you're interested in?

The key difference is as follows:

The V2G Charger is a bi-directional charger. This means it can send power both to your car battery, and then back out from your car battery to your home and the grid. The OVO V2G Charger will only work with Nissan LEAFs. It's got a max power output of 6kW (in both directions) - and is powered by the intelligent Kaluza platform, which means it will charge and discharge your car battery in response to grid signals, and comes with an app that you can use to set schedules and view your charging history.

The Smart Charger will power your car battery, but it won't send power back in the other direction. It has a max power output of 7kW. It is also powered by the Kaluza platform, so you can set your schedules and view your charging history. The Smart Charger will work with pretty much any Electric Vehicle, as long as it is eligible for the OLEV grant.

The Smart Charger is available now, free when you sign up to our EV Everywhere bundle.

The V2G Charger will be rolled out throughout the rest of this year.

Let me know if you need any more details!

Thanks,

Hari
Thanks for the info.

I am looking into the effects V2G has on battery degradation if any at all!
Do you have any information that would be relevant?

Thanks.
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Hmm, @bsauce96 - as this is a relatively new area, there aren’t conclusive studies yet. Some research suggests careful battery management through intelligent charging optimisation can actually improve the health of your battery. We are working closely with Nissan to monitor customers battery health throughout the trial and the Kaluza charging optimisation strategy has been approved by them.
Userlevel 7
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It's a good point @bsauce96. I've spoken to EV owners who are buying through a credit agreement, and found out that the Terms & Conditions prohibit them from using a V2G charger. The Credit Company is exercising an abundance of caution and wanting to ensure that they don't end up with the car being returned at the end of contract with a seriously degraded battery.

From an engineering viewpoint, I agree with @Hari_OVO that a properly designed charging algorithm can actually benefit the battery, extending its life and/or capacity.

Most of us know that a rapid charge/discharge cycle can rejuvenate an old battery which has lost its peak capacity. The charge-regulator I use on my (off-grid) home storage battery has a rejuvenation cycle which it automatically implements every few months.

The question is... how does the EV owner know which chargers to avoid, and which will actually look after the battery condition?
Userlevel 3
Most of us know that a rapid charge/discharge cycle can rejuvenate an old battery which has lost its peak capacity. The charge-regulator I use on my (off-grid) home storage battery has a rejuvenation cycle which it automatically implements every few months.

What battery technology are you using? For example Lithium ion does not have a memory effect so I'm surprised that a a special rejuvination cycle achieves anything other than additional wear on the battery.

I have rejuvinated Ni-Cadmium cells with a very high discharge but thought Ni-Cad had long since fallen out of favour due to a combination of toxicity and memory effect.
Userlevel 7
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No, I'm not talking about a "memory effect", @NoPoke .

The charge-regulator with the rejuvenation cycle which I referred to is for Deep Discharge AGM Lead-acid batteries.

Lithium cells (of all chemistries) degrade for differing reasons, including
  • high temperature
  • low temperature
  • being left in a discharged state
For example, low temperature usage decreases the ability of the electrodes to accept ions. The negative electrode builds up a layer of Lithium ions on it, which reduces capacity and peak current.

Also lithium cells usually include a protection circuit which shuts the cell down before it's full depleted. If left in this mode, the battery no longer has enough power to run the protection circuit itself. It is possible to reawaken it by charging at a very low rate (around 200mA). This is enough to fire up the protection circuitry, thereby allowing the cell to be taken back into its normal charge regime.

I would expect Indra to be investigating the optimal life-extending and capacity-extending algorithms to use with their V2G charger. It's entirely possible that it can pick up data from Nissan's intelligent battery management systems and adjust the charge-discharge cycles accordingly.

There are several YouTube videos of people stripping down Nissan Leaf battery packs from vehicles involved in accidents. They show that each cell "stack" has its own micro-controller communicating with the others in a network to balance charging cycles. If that data-stream is available, then the charger can become part of the network, giving instructions to rejuvenate "tired" stacks.

I doubt that we'll be given any details on such strategies. I'm sure they're "company confidential"!

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